Daily Archive for October 11th, 2019

CONCLUSORY PLEADINGS INSUFFICIENT TO STATE BAD FAITH CLAIM; MERE REFUSAL TO PAY SUM DEMANDED IS NOT BAD FAITH PER SE (Philadelphia Federal)

In this UIM case, the tortfeasor’s insurer settled for $15,000, and the injured insured demanded the $300,000 UIM policy limits from his own carrier. The insurer did not accede to that demand, and the husband and wife insureds sued for breach of contract and bad faith. Judge Schiller dismissed the bad faith claim with leave to amend, if a plausible claim could be pleaded.

Plaintiff failed to allege sufficient facts to state a plausible claim. The insureds’ conclusory allegations included “failing to evaluate Plaintiff’s claim objectively and fairly; failing to complete a prompt and thorough investigation of Plaintiff’s claim… [and] unreasonably withholding policy benefits[.]” There are, however, no specific facts pleaded supporting these conclusions. “Courts consistently hold that bare-bones allegations of bad faith such as these, without more, are insufficient to survive a motion to dismiss. Indeed, conclusory allegations that an insurer ‘unreasonably withheld the payment of [UIM] benefits under the policy…failed to engage in good faith negotiations… [and] failed to perform an adequate investigation’ are insufficient to state a claim for bad faith.”

Similarly, the complaint alleges the insurer “failed to conduct a fair and reasonable investigation into his claim but does not plead any facts related to that investigation.” The court further found the insured could not state a claim on the basis that the insurer “did not pay [the insured’s] claims even when he provided the same information that led [the tortfeasor’s insurer] to tender the limits of its policy.” The court observes that “the failure to immediately accede to a demand for the policy limit cannot, without more, amount to bad faith.” [Though the court does not so state, there appears to be no explanation in the complaint why providing information leading to a $15,000 payment automatically requires an additional $300,000 payment.]

The court provided the insureds “may file an amended complaint to add a bad faith claim, but only if they can plausibly do so.” (Emphasis in original)

Date of Decision: October 4, 2019

Doyle v. Liberty Mutual Ins., U. S. District Court Eastern District of Pennsylvania No. 19-3460, 2019 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 172581, 2019 WL 4917123 (E.D. Pa. Oct. 4, 2019) (Schiller, J.)