Daily Archive for June 3rd, 2020

COMPLAINT ALLEGES SUFFICIENT FACTS TO SET OUT A BAD FAITH “OBDURATE REFUSAL” TO CONSIDER THE INSUREDS’ CLAIM (Philadelphia Federal)

The plaintiffs disputed the insurer’s payout on a fire loss, and brought breach of contract and bad faith claims. The carrier moved to dismiss the bad faith claim.

To plead bad faith, an insured must do more than generally allege the insurer acted unfairly. The insured “must describe with specificity what was unfair.” (Court’s emphasis). Eastern District Judge Pratter found the complaint reached that level of specificity, and denied the motion to dismiss.

The insureds generally allege their claim was undervalued, and that the insurer engaged in “’extreme low- ball/undervaluation tactics and significantly and punitively undervaluing Plaintiffs’ losses and claim.’” The complaint then offers more detailed support for this broad statement.

Plaintiffs allege “the insurance policy provided dwelling coverage up to a limit of $281,200, along with a dwelling extension limit of $28,100. Personal property losses were covered up to a limit of $210,900. Plaintiffs also invoke several estimates they contend they submitted … for the cost of repair and restoration, and, nonetheless [the insurer] failed to indemnify Plaintiffs completely.”

The insureds assert they provided “an estimate of repair for damages to the dwelling in the amount of $57,726.99,” “another estimate of repair for structural losses in the amount of $56,839.12,” “an estimate of personal property loss in the amount of $9,900.36,” “an estimate for cleaning and remediation emergency services in the amount of $4,126.63,” “and an estimate for dry cleaning services in the amount of $21,624.00.” The insurer alloted $255.08 for the dry cleaning, fully recognized the emergency cleaning and remediation costs, and estimated the structural damage at $6,321.45. No payments were offered for any personal property losses.

Taking out depreciation and the deductible, the insurer issued a check for 4,666.46.

In deciding the motion, Judge Pratter observed, “[a]rithmetically, the insurer’s payment was no more than approximately ten percent of the claim….” This “suggest[ed] a possible obdurate refusal to consider the homeowners’ claim.” (Emphasis added). Judge Pratter thus found the factual allegations sufficient to state a bad faith claim on this basis.

Date of Decision: May 28, 2020

Scott v. State Farm Fire & Casualty Co., U.S. District Court Eastern District of Pennsylvania CIVIL ACTION No. 19-5559, 2020 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 92960 (E.D. Pa. May 28, 2020) (Pratter, J.)