Daily Archive for June 25th, 2020

NO UM BAD FAITH CLAIM PLEADED; FIDUCIARY DUTY ALLEGATIONS STRICKEN FROM COMPLAINT (Middle District)

As in the two Eastern District cases summarized earlier this week, Middle District Judge Jennifer P. Wilson dismissed a bad faith claim with leave to amend. Judge Wilson also struck fiduciary duty allegations from the complaint in this uninsured motorist case.

The complaint fails to allege bad faith

The insured alleged the insurer was “supplied with documentation sufficient to fully and fairly evaluate the uninsured motorist claim, but [the insurer] failed to do so.” Judge Wilson found the insured failed to plead specific facts as to what might qualify as bad faith conduct. Plaintiff simply alleges the bad faith elements, and “does not lay out ‘any facts that describe who, what, where, when, and how the alleged bad faith conduct occurred.’” Judge Wilson cited Western District Judge Bissoon’s Mondron opinion to support her conclusion, though she did allow plaintiff leave to amend.

No fiduciary duty in UM/UIM context

The insurer also successfully moved to strike allegations that it owed a fiduciary duty.

The court observed that the insured’s breach of contract claim was based on the UM policy benefits. In Pennsylvania, there is no fiduciary duty arising out of insurance contracts that goes beyond the duty of good faith and fair dealing “until an insurer asserts a stated right under the policy to handle all claims asserted against the insured. … These are not the circumstances in an uninsured motorist claim.”

Rather, the Pennsylvania Supreme Court makes clear in the UM/UIM context “an insurance company’s duty to its insured is one of good faith and fair dealing. It goes without saying that this duty does not allow an insurer to protect its own interests at the expense of its insured’s interests. Nor does it require an insurer to sacrifice its own interests by blindly paying each and every claim submitted by an insured in order to avoid a bad faith lawsuit.”

Thus, plaintiff’s allegations of a fiduciary duty were “not pertinent to her breach of contract claim, which only requires an insurer to act in good faith and fair dealing towards the insured.” As allowing the fiduciary duty allegations would only confuse the actual issues in the case, the motion to strike those allegations was granted.

Date of Decision: June 17, 2020

Miller v. State Farm Mutual Automobile Insurance Co., U.S. District Court Middle District of Pennsylvania Civil No. 1:20-CV-00367, 2020 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 105766 (M.D. Pa. June 17, 2020) (Wilson, J.)