Monthly Archive for August, 2020

How has Covid-19 affected the number of bad faith opinions issued?

From April through August 2020, we’ve posted 51 times on the Bad Faith Blog. Subtracting four posts during that time focusing solely on covid-19 issues without mentioning bad faith, there are 47 posts over this five month period.  During the same five month time-period in 2019, we had 49 posts.  In 2018 it was 54 posts, and in 2017 it was 55 posts.  In short, as of yet, we have not seen a significant decline in opinion writing on bad faith insurance claims during the Covid-19 pandemic.

We also note that the Pennsylvania and New Jersey Insurance Bad Faith Case Law Blog reached 1,700 posts this month, since our first post in June 2006.

ARE THERE MANY KINDS OF STATUTORY BAD FAITH, EVEN WHEN NO COVERAGE IS DUE ? (Western District)

This statutory bad faith opinion issued out of the Western District of Pennsylvania yesterday.

The court finds no coverage based on a one-year suit limitation provision and/or a policy exclusion. Thus, plaintiffs have no bad faith claim based on denial of coverage, as no coverage is due, and that claim is dismissed with prejudice.

The court expressly finds, however, that there are other forms of statutory bad faith cognizable under 42 Pa.C.S. § 8371, beyond coverage denials.  It identifies a commonly recognized exception that if the contract claim fails for a technical reason, like exceeding a limitation period, the bad faith claim can still proceed.  The court goes beyond this kind of technical exception to recognize further that poor claims handling may be actionable independently, e.g., knowing or recklessly inadequate investigation, even when no benefit is due under the policy.

On this distinct bad faith investigation claim, plaintiffs only plead (1) conclusory allegations, along with (2) a single fact that cannot constitute bad faith standing alone. Thus, the court dismisses the bad faith investigation claim, but without prejudice. Plaintiffs have leave to file an amended complaint on their investigation bad faith claim, even though no coverage is due under the policy.

[Note: As those following this blog know, we have addressed the scope of cognizable claims under section 8371, and raised the question as to whether cognizable claims under section 8371 are limited to cases where first party benefits due have been denied, or where a defense and/or indemnification due have been refused on third party claims.  Our analysis always begins with the 2007 Supreme Court decision in Toy v. Metropolitan Life Insurance Company.  See, e.g., this post, and this article. The present opinion relies, in part, on the Third Circuit’s unpublished decision in Gallatin Fuels. As discussed in the linked article, Gallatin Fuels does not address Toy. We are also attaching a portion of a brief recently filed in a Philadelphia federal court, from attorney Lee Applebaum, as part of a motion that has now become moot.]

Date of Decision:  August 26, 2020

Palek v. State Farm Fire and Casualty Co., U.S. District Court Western District of Pennsylvania No. 20-170 (W.D. Pa. Aug. 26, 2020) (Flowers Conti, J.)

Our thanks to Attorney Daniel Cummins of the excellent Tort Talk Blog for bringing this case to our attention.

THE BERG ODYSSEY HAS ENDED

After 24 years, 22 in litigation, it appears Berg v. Nationwide finally reached an end yesterday when the Supreme Court, in a split decision, dismissed plaintiffs’ appeal.  To quote:

“PER CURIAM

AND NOW, this 25th day of August, 2020, the Court being divided in a fashion which prevents a majority disposition, the appeal is DISMISSED. The application to file a post-argument submission is DISMISSED as moot.

Justice Donohue did not participate in the consideration or decision of this matter.”

A copy of the Supreme Court’s Per Curiam Order can be found here.

Justice Wecht wrote a 60-page opinion in favor of reversal, a copy of which can be found here.  Justice Saylor wrote a 24-page opinion in favor of affirmance, a copy of which can be found here.

A summary of the Superior Court’s 2018 decision is posted here, and amendment thereto is posted here.  These are now the final rulings in this case.

A summary of Judge Sprecher’s 2014 trial court decision awarding $21,000,000, reversed by the Superior Court in its now final decision, can be found here.

Judge Sprecher’s ruling followed an earlier 2012 Superior Court decision in Berg (44 A.3d 1164), summarized here. This 2012 opinion has proven influential. A quick search shows it being cited over 70 times by courts, and tens of times in secondary materials.  The 2012 Berg opinion was authored by then Superior Court Judge Donohue, who, as Justice Donahue, did not participate in this Supreme Court decision dismissing the appeal.

ASSIGNMENT TO FORMER ATTORNEY NOT PERMITTED; STATE COURT COMPLAINT FAILS TO ALLEGE SUFFICIENT FACTS TO PLEAD BAD FAITH (Superior Court of Pennsylvania) (Not precedential)

In this non-precedential decision, Pennsylvania’s Superior Court followed federal case law out of the Eastern District, Feingold v. Liberty Mutual, in holding that a client’s bad faith claim could not be assigned to her former attorney. [Note: In Allstate v. Wolfe, Pennsylvania’s Supreme Court did find it possible to assign bad faith claims within certain parameters. The holding in that case identified two proper classes of assignees: “We conclude that the entitlement to assert damages under Section 8371 may be assigned by an insured to an injured plaintiff and judgment creditor….”]

The court also found that “the complaint does not include sufficient factual averments regarding how [the insurer] acted unreasonably and in bad faith. …  the complaint contains ‘either simple reiterations of the standard of proving bad faith or bald allegations that the standard has been breached.’”

This last point is consistent with numerous federal cases finding that adequate pleading must include allegations of fact.

Date of Decision: August 14, 2020

Feingold v. McCormick & Priore PC, Superior Court of Pennsylvania No. 3273 EDA 2019, 2020 WL 4728111 (Pa. Super. Ct. Aug. 14, 2020) (King, Lazarus, Strassburger, JJ.) (Not precedential)

INSURER PUT ON UNREBUTTED EVIDENCE THAT ITS CLAIM DENIAL WAS REASONABLE (Philadelphia Federal)

In this case, the insurer moved for summary judgment on bad faith, and the insured did not respond to the motion. After a review of the record and legal arguments, the Court granted the insurer’s motion.

The case involved a personal injury. The insurer had an independent medical review performed on the insured’s medical records. The carrier’s doctor concluded that the injuries the insured alleged were not the result of the accident at issue. Rather, those injuries were caused by a prior accident. The carrier argued this alone was sufficient to establish a reasonable basis to deny coverage.

As stated, the insured did not respond to the carrier’s motion, and thus put forward no evidence that the insurer acted in bad faith by failing to consider the relevant medical records. Judge Brody agreed:

“After reviewing [the] motion and evidence, I conclude that [the insurer] has satisfied its summary-judgment burden, shifting the burden to Plaintiff to demonstrate the existence of genuine disputes of material fact that preclude summary judgment. Plaintiff has failed to carry his burden. Despite several chances to do so, Plaintiff never filed any objection to [the] Motion for Partial Summary Judgment. He has not pointed to any evidence that [the insurer] behaved in bad faith, nor has he offered any evidence to refute the evidence [the insurer] offered in support of its motion.”

Date of Decision: August 13, 2020

Dwyer v. Nationwide Property and Casualty Insurance Company, U.S. District Court Eastern District of Pennsylvania No. CV 19-2814, 2020 WL 4699047 (E.D. Pa. Aug. 13, 2020) (Brody, J.)

BAD FAITH STATUTE DOES NOT APPLY TO MORTGAGE LENDER

A homeowner filed counterclaims against his lender in a foreclosure action. The counterclaims included an insurance bad faith claim. The Superior Court affirmed the trial court’s ruling that the bad faith statute only addresses the actions of insurance companies, and this was not such a case.

Date of Decision:  August 7, 2020

Wells Fargo Bank, v. Pilchesky, Superior Court of Pennsylvania No. 1199 MDA 2019, 2020 WL 4558801 (Pa. Super. Ct. Aug. 7, 2020) (McLaughlin, Panella, Stevens, JJ.)

If you want to get an overview on the law of removal and remand in bad faith cases, this is the case for you.

Eastern District Judge Marston reviews three lines of U.S. Supreme Court and Third Circuit precedent in determining when, and whether, the burden of proof in establishing the jurisdictional minimum for removal purposes is “legal certainty” versus “preponderance of the evidence.”  She concludes that in cases where the insured specifically pleads compensatory damages are less than $50,000, a “legal certainty” test still applies until the Third Circuit says otherwise. This is so even if the plaintiff additionally demands punitive damages, attorney’s fees and super-interest under the bad faith statute.

In this context, a removing defendant’s allegation that punitive damages and attorneys’ fees could result in overall damages exceeding $75,000, fails to meet the legal certainty test.

[Comment: The upshot appears to be that if a plaintiff specifically alleges compensatory damages will not exceed $75,000 (typically not to exceed $50,000 in Pennsylvania state pleadings), even while additionally seeking statutory punitive damages and attorney’s fees, removal is not going to be possible.  Under Rule 11, the removing party would have difficulty averring to a certainty that punitive damages and attorney’s fees will be awarded to a legal certainty, and will use qualifying language such as “court be awarded” or “if awarded”.  Moreover, it is unlikely a defendant insurer will want to establish legal certainty by making a detailed argument against itself as to why it should be encumbered with punitive damages for its own reckless or intentional conduct.

Among the questions that arise: Why is a bad faith claim for punitive damages any less a legal certainty than a contested claim for compensatory damages? Put another way, doesn’t a contested claim for punitive damages or attorney’s fees have as much reality as a contested claim for compensatory damages?

Bad faith claims only allow for three types of damages: super-interest, punitive damages, and attorney’s fees.  There is no statutory bad faith claim for compensatory or incidental damages. Thus, to even plead a bad faith claim meeting Rule 11 standards, the plaintiff must believe that punitive damages, attorney’s fees, or super-interest are warranted, as this is the only possible form of relief provided under section 8371.

Just as a plaintiff believes and pleads it is entitled to $49,312.25 in compensatory damages — and this number is treated as an undisputed fact for jurisdictional purposes even if a defendant insurer completely rejects that sum — so too must the plaintiff believe that it is entitled to punitive damages, attorney’s fees and/or super-interest in bringing the bad faith claim.  Yet this distinct damage claim, under a separate legal theory, may come to be treated as a nullity for purposes of calculating the jurisdictional minimum.

One possibility here could be the potential damages available under section 8371 are discretionary and not mandatory. Thus, it might be that the trier of fact may not award any of these damages at the end of the day, or may make a minimal award.  It also might be the case, however, that the trier of fact will find at the end of the day that the same plaintiff’s compensatory damage claim is meritless or only a fraction of the sum requested. Yet, that number as pleaded is treated as truth.]

The Facts of the Case

Plaintiffs brought breach of contract and bad faith claims in this water damage case.  Their contract claim’s ad damnum clause sought “judgment against Defendant in an amount not in excess of $50,000 together with interest and court costs.” In the bad faith count’s ad damnum clause, Plaintiffs requested “statutory damages including interest…, court costs, attorneys’ fees, punitive damages, and such other compensatory and/or consequential damages as are permitted by law.”

The carrier removed the case from Philadelphia’s Court of Common Pleas to federal court, and Plaintiffs moved to remand.  The District Court remanded.

The court observed “’[i]t is now settled in this Court that the party asserting federal jurisdiction in a removal case bears the burden of showing, at all stages of the litigation, that the case is properly before the federal court.’”  As set out above, the issue was whether the court should set the burden at “legal certainty” or “preponderance of the evidence.”  After doing a lengthy and detailed historical analysis of each strand of case law, the court concluded that, in a case such as this where the insured specifically pleaded the compensatory damage claims were less than $50,000, the “legal certainty” test applied.

The court observed it could aggregate the demands against a single defendant in determining jurisdiction. Further, punitive damages could be considered, so long as the estimates were realistic, with all doubts construed in favor of remand.  Such an analysis must be objective and not “pie-in-the-sky”.

The compensatory damages were a little over $24,000. The insurer argued that it was “not unreasonable to expect that a punitive damage award three or four times the amount in controversy, or beyond, could be rendered by the trier of fact.” It suggested, however, that the court should apply a 2-1 ratio ($48,000) and a measure of attorney’s fees at $30,000, as that “would not be unreasonable to expect that [fee sum] over the course of an approximate ten-month litigation…” This would place the claim at over $100,000, sufficient for jurisdiction.  The court rejected the argument.

The court looked at earlier case law finding such arguments failed to reach the level of “legal certainty.” In those cases, the qualifying language presented the fatal flaw, e.g., “claims for punitive damages and attorney fees, amongst other relief…could exceed $75,000.”; “it is ‘certainly possible for the damages to meet or exceed the jurisdictional limit of $75,000.’” A “suggestion of possible future events,” however, is not enough.

In one case relied upon to support remand, the compensatory damages were $11,000 and the punitive damages needed to be six times that amount to obtain jurisdiction. The court remanded for two reasons: (1) there was no certainty the plaintiff would “recover punitive damages at all, as she has not alleged any particular facts suggesting bad faith on the part of [the insurance company], other than her assertion that she was entitled to benefits but has not received them.”; (2) the carrier “supplied no basis for the Court to find that [the plaintiff] will recover the necessary amount of punitive damages.”

[Comment: This analysis implies a number of considerations, akin to the comment above. In determining remand, the court is looking to the merits of the plaintiff’s case in evaluating whether defendant met its burden.  The court basically determined on a motion to remand that the plaintiff’s bad faith claim, as pleaded, could not withstand a federal motion to dismiss.  The court then put the burden on the defendant to make the case against itself as to why punitive damages should be awarded against it.]

Judge Marston found the instant case akin to these earlier cases. In the present case, the carrier only alleged “that it is not ‘unreasonable’ to find that punitive damages ‘could’ amount to three or four times the amount in controversy, and that it would ‘not be unreasonable’ to find that attorney’s fees ‘could’ approach $30,000.This did not “satisfy [the defendant’s] burden by pointing to the mere possibility that the [insureds] ‘could’ be awarded punitive damages and attorney’s fees above the amount in controversy threshold.” “Moreover … [the insureds] are ‘not certain to recover punitive damages at all,’ because the complaint does not allege ‘any particular facts suggesting bad faith on the part of [the insurance company], other than [the] assertion that [they were] entitled to benefits but ha[ve] not received them.’”

The court held: “Without more, we cannot find that [the insurer] has carried its burden of showing to a legal certainty that the amount in controversy exceeds $75,000, and we must remand the case. However, if on remand, [the insurer] uncovers new evidence which shows that the amount in controversy exceeds $75,000, it may again seek removal to this Court.”

Date of Decision:  August 4, 2020

Sciarrino v. State Farm Fire and Casualty Company, U.S. District Court Eastern District of Pennsylvania No. 2:20-CV-2930-KSM, 2020 WL 4470611 (E.D. Pa. Aug. 4, 2020) (Marston, J.)

INSURED FAILS TO ADEQUATELY PLEAD BAD FAITH; CAN CONDIO BE USED TO DEFINE THE SCOPE OF THE BAD FAITH STATUTE AFTER TOY (Philadelphia Federal)

The insured failed to plead a plausible bad faith claim in this first party property loss case.

We will address two things about this case.  First, the details in the court’s decision granting the motion to dismiss.  Second, the court’s finding that statutory bad faith can consist of more than the denial of first party benefits or the denial of a defense and indemnification in third party claims.

Failure to Plead a Plausible Bad Faith Claim

As discussed many times by the federal district courts addressing bad faith claims, conclusory allegations simply carry no weight in adequately pleading a bad faith claim. Courts will parse the complaint to determine what non-conclusory facts have actually been pleaded, what allegations are merely conclusory boilerplate and can be disregarded, and whether facts left standing after that process can support a plausible bad faith claim.

In this case, the facts pleaded only included the location of covered property, that a peril covered under the policy caused direct physical loss and damage to the property, that prompt and timely notice of loss was given to the carrier, and that the insured fully complied with all necessary policy terms and conditions.

The complaint went on to aver generically 13 forms of bad faith behavior, with no factual detail (listed below). The court readily found these allegations conclusory.

The court gave particular attention to a few of these conclusory allegations. For example, the complaint alleges the carrier “’misrepresent[ed] pertinent facts or policy provisions relating to coverages at issue’ and ‘sen[t] correspondence falsely representing’ that Plaintiff was not entitled to benefits under the Policy….” However, the complaint failed “to explain what those misrepresentations may have been.”

Plaintiff also averred that the insurer “’fail[ed] to fairly negotiate the amount of [Plaintiff’s] loss” … but provides no details describing what was unfair about the negotiations.”  Judge Padova added that “[t]he Complaint’s remaining bad faith allegations merely assert that [the insurer] was not prompt, thorough, fair, or reasonable in how it handled or denied the claim, but does not provide any facts explaining how [it] was not prompt, thorough, fair, or reasonable.”

The Complaint was dismissed with leave to amend.

Can Courts Rely on the Superior Court’s 2006 Condio Decision to Determine the Scope of the Bad Faith Statute after the 2007 Supreme Court Decision in Toy v. Metropolitan Life

Though not ultimately relevant to the court’s decision, the opinion states that:

“‘[S]ection 8371 is not restricted to an insurer’s bad faith in denying a claim. An action for bad faith may [also] extend to the insurer’s investigative practices.’” Greene v. United Servs. Auto. Ass’n, 936 A.2d 1178, 1187 (Pa. Super. Ct. 2007) (alterations in original) (quoting Condio, 899 A.2d at 1142). Indeed, the term bad faith “‘encompasses a wide variety of objectionable conduct’” including “‘lack of good faith investigation into facts, and failure to communicate with the claimant.’” Id. at 1188 (quoting Condio, 899 A.2d at 1142).

The Superior Court decided Condio in 2006.

In the 2007 Supreme Court Toy v. Metropolitan Life decision, Chief Justice Cappy, writing for the majority, observed that at the time of the Bad Faith Statute’s 1990 enactment, “the term ‘bad faith’ concerned the duty of good faith and fair dealing in the parties’ contract and the manner by which an insurer discharged its obligations of defense and indemnification in the third-party claim context or its obligation to pay for a loss in the first-party claim context.” “In other words, the term captured those actions an insurer took when called upon to perform its contractual obligations of defense and indemnification or payment of a loss that failed to satisfy the duty of good faith and fair dealing implied in the parties’ insurance contract.”

Justice Eakin, writing in concurrence, found this reading too narrow. In their competing opinions, Justices Cappy and Eakin specifically debate the meaning and application of Condio in statutory bad faith actions. Justice Eakin cites Condio, among other Pennsylvania Superior Court cases, to argue the majority’s interpretation of the bad faith statute is too narrow.

In response, Chief Justice Cappy does not reject the Condio opinion, but states that Condio is addressing a different aspect of “bad faith” than what the court had to decide that day.

Justice Cappy finds there are two aspects to “bad faith” in the context of section 8371.  “As we observe in footnotes 17 and 18, we do not consider what actions amount to bad faith [conduct], what actions of an insurer may be admitted as proof of its bad faith, whether an insurer’s violations of the UIPA are relevant to proving a bad faith claim or whether the standard of conduct the Superior Court has applied to assess an insurer’s performance of contractual obligations in bad faith cases is the correct one.”  Rather, “[i]n this area, the term ‘bad faith’ refers not only to [1] the claim an insured brings against his insurer under the bad faith statute, but also, [2] to the conduct an insured asserts his insurer exhibited and establishes that it is liable. These matters although related, are nonetheless, separate and distinct. We write to the former.  The concurrence appears to write to the latter.”

Justice Cappy specifically describes the issue in Condio, and other Superior Court cases cited by Justice Eakin, as “whether the evidence offered at trial by the insured as to the insurer’s behavior was sufficient to prove the bad faith claim and/or admissible in a § 8371 action.” Thus, it appears, Condio does not address the scope of what claims are cognizable under the Bad Faith Statute in the first instance, but addresses the adequacy of evidence in proving bad faith.

In light of (1) this distinction raised by the Toy Majority between the two uses of the term “bad faith”, (2) in direct response to Justice Eakin’s argument that statutory bad faith claims should broadly encompass the kind of behavior identified in Condio, and that such claims not be limited to “the manner by which an insurer discharged its obligations of defense and indemnification in the third-party claim context or its obligation to pay for a loss in the first-party claim context,” then (3) it is questionable that Condio, and other pre-Toy Superior Court cases, can expand the category of cognizable claims under the Bad Faith Statute to include conduct beyond “the manner by which an insurer discharged its obligations of defense and indemnification in the third-party claim context or its obligation to pay for a loss in the first-party claim context….”

See this article for a more detailed discussion.

Date of Decision: August 4, 2020

HARRIS v. ALLSTATE VEHICLE AND PROPERTY INSURANCE COMPANY, U.S. District Court Eastern District of Pennsylvania No. CV 20-1285, 2020 WL 4470402 (E.D. Pa. Aug. 4, 2020) (Padova, J.)

Conclusory allegations in the Complaint

  1. by sending correspondence falsely representing that Plaintiff’s loss [was not] caused by a peril insured against under the Policy [and that Plaintiff] was not entitled to benefits due and owing under the Policy;

  2. in failing to complete a prompt and thorough investigation of Plaintiff’s claim before representing that such claim is not covered under the Policy;

  3. in failing to pay Plaintiff’s covered loss in a prompt and timely manner;

  4. in failing to objectively and fairly evaluate Plaintiff’s claim;

  5. in conducting an unfair and unreasonable investigation of Plaintiff’s claim;

  6. in asserting Policy defenses without a reasonable basis in fact;

  7. in flatly misrepresenting pertinent facts or policy provisions relating to coverages at issue and placing unduly restrictive interpretations on the Policy and/or claim forms;

  8. in failing to keep Plaintiff or [her] representatives fairly and adequately advised as to the status of the claim;

  9. in unreasonably valuing the loss and failing to fairly negotiate the amount of the loss with Plaintiff or [her] representatives;

  10. in failing to promptly provide a reasonable factual explanation of the basis for the denial of Plaintiff’s claim;

  11. in unreasonably withholding policy benefits;

  12. in acting unreasonably and unfairly in response to Plaintiff’s claim;

m. in unnecessarily and unreasonably compelling Plaintiff to institute this lawsuit to obtain policy benefits for a covered loss, that Defendant should have paid promptly and without the necessity of litigation.

PLEADING A DISPUTE OVER VALUE AND SUBMITTING MEDICAL RECORDS TO SUPPORT ONE VALUE DOES NOT MAKE OUT A BAD FAITH CLAIM (Western District)

This Western District UM bad faith decision aligns with recent Eastern and Middle District cases in finding that the insureds failed to plead a plausible bad faith claim.

Pleading Standards, General

Among other things, the court observed:

  1. Although a complaint does not need to allege detailed factual allegations to survive a Rule 12(b)(6) motion, a complaint must provide more than labels and conclusions.

  2. A “formulaic recitation of the elements of a cause of action will not do.”

  3. “Factual allegations must be enough to raise a right to relief above the speculative level” and be “sufficient to state a claim for relief that is plausible on its face.”

  4. Facial plausibility exists “when the plaintiff pleads factual content that allows the court to draw the reasonable inference that the defendant is liable for the misconduct alleged.”

  5. “The plausibility standard is not akin to a ‘probability requirement,’ but it asks for more than a sheer possibility that a defendant has acted unlawfully. [ ] Where a complaint pleads facts that are ‘merely consistent with’ a defendant’s liability, it ‘stops short of the line between possibility and plausibility of ‘entitlement to relief.’”

Pleading Principles in Bad Faith Cases

The court also looked at prior case law in adducing pleading principles applied in insurance bad faith cases:

  1. In the bad faith context, district courts have required more than “conclusory” or “bare-bones” allegations that an insurance company acted in bad faith by listing a number of generalized accusations without sufficient factual support.

  2. Thus, the assessment of the sufficiency of a particular complaint often turns on the specificity of the pleadings and calls for recital of specific factual allegations from which bad faith may be inferred in order to defeat a motion to dismiss.

  3. Where a complaint’s § 8371 bad faith claim simply relies upon breach of contract allegations, coupled with a conclusory assertion that the failure to pay under an insurance policy was “unreasonable” or made in bad faith, courts have dismissed such claims, but typically have afforded litigants an opportunity to further amend and articulate their bad faith claims.

  4. A motion to dismiss will be granted where the “[p]laintiff’s generic invocation of statutory language is insufficient to satisfy his federal pleading burden.”

  5. There is no plausible claim stated in a statutory bad faith case where the complaint is devoid of “any facts that describe who, what, where, when, and how the alleged bad faith conduct occurred.”

Application of Law to Facts Pleaded Leads to Dismissal with Leave to Amend

The complaint alleges plaintiffs were injured by an uninsured motorist and sought UM coverage from the carrier. The policy had $100,000/$300,000 limits. Plaintiffs submitted a demand package, including relevant medical records.  The carrier offered a total of $23,000 to both plaintiffs. One plaintiff later submitted a lost wages claim of $18,000. The insurer increased the offer by another $3,000, but made clear it would not evaluate the lost wage claim.

Plaintiffs’ bad faith count relied on these factual allegations, which the court described as “breach of contract allegations,” and then added “a laundry list of generic allegations that may amount to bad faith….” This was not enough.

First, the court pointed out that plaintiffs failed to attach any exhibits to the complaint. Further, they did not plead “any facts to explain how or why the offer made by [the insurer] is nothing more than a legitimate dispute over the value of the claim.” The court made clear that disputes over value do “not necessarily give rise to bad faith; rather, a plaintiff must allege ‘factual content indicating that [the insurance company] lacked a reasonable basis for its tendered offer or that it knew or recklessly disregarded a lack of reasonable basis for the offer.”

The court dismissed the bad faith claim, with leave to amend.

Date of Decision: August 4, 2020

TAYLOR v. GEICO CHOICE INSURANCE COMPANY, No. 2:20-CV-00729-CRE, 2020 WL 4474926 (W.D. Pa. Aug. 4, 2020) (Reed Eddy, M.J.)

Our thanks to Attorney Daniel Cummins of the excellent Tort Talk Blog for bringing this case to our attention.

“DEEMS EXPEDIENT” CLAUSE UNDERMINES BAD FAITH SETTLEMENT CLAIM; 4 YEAR STATUTE OF LIMITATIONS APPLIES TO CONTRACT BASED BAD FAITH CLAIMS (Philadelphia Federal)

The essence of the insured’s case is the insurer settled claims against the insured without the insured’s knowledge or permission, and without adequate investigation.  The insurer paid $995,000 out of a $1 Million policy to the person injured in the insured’s ambulance. The insured asserts the carrier overpaid to settle, resulting in $200,000 in damages from increased premiums.

The complaint did not include any reference to statutory bad faith, 42 Pa.C.S. § 8371. Thus, the court found that the sole “bad faith” claim at issue was a breach of the contractual duty of good faith and fair dealing.

The insurer moved to dismiss based on section 8371’s two-year statute of limitations. Since this is a contract based bad faith claim, however, the statute of limitations is four years, and that argument was rejected.

As to the merits, the carrier asserts the policy language expressly provides it can settle any claim or suit as it considers appropriate. Thus, it has complete authority to settle within policy limits at any amount.  The insured argues this is “absurd,” but offers no authority to support its position.

The court ruled for the insurer, observing: “Pennsylvania law disfavors bad faith claims where a policy grants the insurer discretion to settle and where such settlement is within policy limits. However, ‘in limited circumstances,’ ‘a claim for bad faith may … be asserted against the insurance company notwithstanding a ‘deems expedient’ provision … if such settlement was contrary to the intent and expectation of the parties.’” Here, the court found the “settle when appropriate” language to be the equivalent of a deems expedient provision.

The court cited two precedents where a deems expedient provision undermined the possibility of a bad faith claim. In the first, there was no evidence the parties did not freely negotiate policy terms. As to the second, the Third Circuit interpreted “’deems expedient’ clauses broadly—so broadly as to allow insurers to settle claims subject to such clauses ‘for nuisance value of the claim’ or even where a ‘suit … presents no valid claim against the defendants.’”

In the present case, the insured does not contend the deems expedient clause was not freely negotiated. Moreover, even if the insurer could have done more to investigate the underlying claim, “the ‘deems expedient’ clause in its policy afforded [the insurer] the option of settling … simply because it preferred settlement over further investigation of his claim.”

Thus, the bad faith claim was dismissed with prejudice.

Date of Decision: July 22, 2020

Healthfleet Ambulance, Inc. v. Markel Insurance Co., U.S. District Court Eastern District of Pennsylvania CIVIL ACTION NO. 20-2250, 2020 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 129185 (E.D. Pa. July 22, 2020) (Beetlestone, J.)