Daily Archive for October 15th, 2020

PLAUSIBLE BAD FAITH WHERE INSURER’S POSITION RESULTS IN ILLUSORY COVERAGE; NO BAD FAITH WHERE NO COVERAGE DUE (Western District)

This case centers on a dispute between the insureds and their homeowners carrier over whether the carrier had agreed to policy limit increases based on a multi-million dollar renovation.  The court details a series of alleged telephone communications between the insureds and the carrier, which the insureds claim committed the carrier to the policy limit increases.  This all occurred before the fire loss at issue.

In addition, the policy included a provision for “Home Protection Coverage”. This provision provides for a 25% coverage extension on existing policy limits.  “Essentially, the Home Protector Coverage’s purpose is to provide extended coverage in the event a homeowner’s losses exceed the policy’s coverage limits.”  The insureds also they did everything necessary for the Home Protection Coverage to be in place at the time of their fire loss.

The carrier asserted to the contrary that there was both no evidence properly documenting an increase in policy limits, or that the insureds met the requirements needed to receive the Home Protection Coverage. The insurer rejected claims for the higher limits and the Home Protection Coverage, and the insureds sued for breach of contract, statutory bad faith, promissory estoppel, and violation of the Unfair Trade Practices and Consumer Protection Law (UTPCPL).

Breach of Contract Claims Partially Survive

The court dismissed the breach of contract claim for extended policy limits, without prejudice. There was no plausible claim that a contract existed as such or through the reasonable expectations doctrine.

However, the court found the breach of contract claim for the “Home Protection Coverage” stated a plausible claim.  The court held that to find otherwise would make the relevant policy language illusory.

BAD FAITH

The court set forth various principles on statutory bad faith, though incorrectly stating that the insured must demonstrate some motive of self-interest or ill will.

Plausible Bad Faith Claim Stated for Pursuing Argument that would make Coverage Illusory

The court found the insureds stated a plausible bad faith claim as to the denial of Home Protection Coverage. The insureds alleged they paid their premiums, gave notice of renovations, and timely submitted their coverage claims. “Plaintiffs thus assert that Defendant ‘unreasonably denied the benefits’ and ‘had knowledge of their lack of reasonable basis for denying benefits.’”

More specifically, at the pleading stage, the Court had already “rejected carrier’s interpretation of the Home Protector Coverage … and thus cannot accept Defendant’s argument that its basis for denial of Home Protector Coverage was reasonable because Plaintiffs ‘could not show that their property was fully insured for replacement cost at policy inception.’ …. Such an interpretation would construct an illusory promise of coverage, which the Court has already determined it should not entertain.”

Failure to State Plausible Bad Faith Claim where no Coverage is Due

As to the bad faith claims concerning extending the policy limits, the Complaint did not set out a plausible claim.  As stated above, the court ruled the insureds failed to plead a plausible claim for breach of contract on extending policy limits through the various telephone communications or failing to reschedule an inspection. “As such, the Court agrees with Defendant that in ‘the absence of insurance coverage, there can be no bad faith by the insurer as a matter of law.’” As with the contract claim, dismissal was without prejudice.

Promissory Estoppel and UTPCPL

The court rejected that promissory estoppel could create or increase insurance coverage.  It allowed the claim to proceed, but solely as to amending allegations that could go to the breach of contract claims.

The court agreed that the UTPCPL could not create liability for claims handling. It was not clear to the court, however, whether the alleged deceptive conduct occurred at times other than during claims handling.

The court then carries out a fairly detailed analysis of significant UTPCPL concepts such as malfeasance vs. nonfeasance, pleading intent, pleading with particularity, and whether the gist of the action doctrine might apply.

The court concludes, “while Plaintiffs’ averments of deceptive conduct are not categorically barred by the UTPCPL to the extent set out above, Plaintiffs have not pled their claim with the level of particularity required by Pennsylvania law. Accordingly, the Court grants Defendant’s Motion to Dismiss … without prejudice and with leave to amend.”

Date of Decision: September 24, 2020

Luketich, v. USAA Casualty Insurance Company, U.S. District Court for the Western District of Pennsylvania No. 2:20-CV-00315, 2020 WL 5669017 (W.D. Pa. Sept. 24, 2020) (Hornak, J.)