Archive for the 'PA – No coverage duty, no bad faith' Category

NO BAD FAITH WHERE POLICY PROPERLY TERMINATED (Philadelphia Federal)

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This case centered on whether the insurer’s notices of lapse and termination were effective to terminate the policy. The policy required the carrier to “send” these notices. There was no dispute that the insurer caused the required notices to be mailed, but the insured denied ever receiving them.

The insurer argued mailing alone was sufficient to meet the “send” requirement, but the insured argued the policy further required that the notices actually be received. The term “send” was not defined in the policy. Judge Wolson looked to dictionary meaning of “send,” along with case law on mailing required documents. He concluded that “send” did not mean sent and received. Thus, the insurer’s mailings alone were sufficient to terminate the policy, whether or not the insured received the notices.

The insured also alleged bad faith in terminating the policy. Judge Wolson rejected this claim on the simple ground that there was a reasonable basis to terminate the policy, stating:

Pennsylvania’s law creates a cause of action against an insurance company “if the court finds that the insurer has acted in bad faith toward the insured.” 42 Pa.C.S. § 8371. Pennsylvania courts have defined “bad faith” as “any frivolous or unfounded refusal to pay proceeds of a policy.” Rancosky v. Washington National Ins. Co., 642 Pa. 153, 170 A.3d 364, 365 (Pa. 2017) (quotation omitted). A threshold question in a bad faith action is whether the employer had a reasonable basis for denying benefits under the policy. See Condio v. Erie Ins. Exch., 2006 PA Super 92, 899 A.2d 1136, 1143 (Pa. Super. Ct. 2006). As discussed above, [the insurer] had a reasonable basis for denying benefits. Thus, [the insured’s] bad faith claim fails.

Date of Decision: May 20, 2020

Wetty v. AXA Equitable Life Insurance Co., U.S. District Court Eastern District of Pennsylvania Case No. 2:18-cv-04756-JDW, 2020 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 88550 (E.D. Pa. May 20, 2020) (Wolson, J.)

NO BAD FAITH BY DEFINITION IF COVERAGE DENIAL IS REASONABLE (Western District)

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“When an insurer’s coverage denial was reasonable ‘on the basis of the plain meaning of the Policy and relevant exclusions and definitions,’ there can be no ‘bad faith’ as a matter of law.”

Unlike the Eastern District’s recent decision in Smith v. AAA Interinsurance Exchange, the Pennsylvania Supreme Court’s decision in Gallagher v. Geico did not void the household exclusion under the facts of this case. The court thus found no UIM coverage due, and because the auto insurer “properly denied coverage, Plaintiffs’ tag-along claims for bad faith and violations of the Pennsylvania Unfair Trade Practices and Consumer Protection Law, 73 Pa. Stat. Ann. § 201-1, et seq., also fail.”

The insured was injured on a motorcycle she owned. The motorcycle was covered by Progressive. The insured owned two other vehicles covered by Mid-Century, the present defendant. The insured waived UIM coverage under the Progressive policy. She still sought coverage under the Mid-Century policy, relying on Gallagher, because she had not executed a stacking waiver in connection with the Mid-Century policy.

Gallagher does not apply where stacking is not at issue

The insured’s claim against Mid-Century failed. Gallagher stands for the proposition that the household exclusion cannot limit stacking without a stacking waiver. In this case, however, the insured had waived UIM coverage under her Progressive policy, so there was no stacking at issue. Rather, she was seeking primary UIM coverage against Mid-Century. Thus, Gallagher did not apply, and Mid-Century properly relied on the household exclusion to deny coverage.

No coverage due means no bad faith by definition

In dismissing the bad faith claim, the court found plaintiffs could not make out the first prong of the bad faith test, i.e., that the denial was unreasonable. “When an insurer’s coverage denial was reasonable ‘on the basis of the plain meaning of the Policy and relevant exclusions and definitions,’ there can be no ‘bad faith’ as a matter of law.” “Put differently, if Mid-Century properly denied coverage, which the Court finds it did, it could not, by definition, have acted in bad faith by denying coverage.”

Any other putative bad faith claims were dismissed for merely making conclusory allegations.

UTPCPL claim fails for variety of reasons

Lastly, the court dismissed plaintiffs’ Unfair Trade Practices and Consumer Protection Law (UTPCPL) claims for a variety of reasons. First, there was no improper conduct. Next, even if there was misconduct, the UTPCPL only applies to conduct in connection with issuing the insurance policy, not the performance of the insurer’s obligations under the policy after it is issued. Third, even assuming arguendo the plaintiffs could have overcome these two hurdles, they solely pleaded nonfeasance, and the UTPCPL only applies to claims of malfeasance.

No leave to amend was given, and judgment on the pleadings was entered for the insurer.

Date of Decision: May 19, 2020

Dunleavy v. Mid-Century Insurance Company, U.S. District Court Western District of Pennsylvania No. 2:19-cv-1304, 2020 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 88024 (W.D. Pa. May 19, 2020) (Ranjan, J.)

Our thanks to Attorney and Mediator Daniel Cummins of the excellent Tort Talk Blog for bringing this case to our attention.

NO BAD FAITH WHERE NO BENEFITS DENIED; NO PRIVATE ACTION UNDER UIPA OR UCSP REGULATIONS; NO DECEPTIVE CONDUCT IN NOTICE OF NEW ENDORSEMENT (Philadelphia Federal)

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In this case, the court makes clear that “Bad faith claims cover a range of conduct relating to the improper denial of benefits under the applicable contract.” The court quotes the Pennsylvania Supreme Court’s decision in Toy v. Metropolitan Life Ins. Co., 593 Pa. 20, 928 A.2d 186, 199 (Pa. 2007), to highlight the point that statutory bad faith claims must relate to a denial of benefits: “’In other words, the term [bad faith] captured those actions an insurer took when called upon to perform its contractual obligations of defense and indemnification or payment of a loss that failed to satisfy the duty of good faith and fair dealing implied in the parties’ insurance contract.’”

This first party property damage case centered on a policy endorsement changing the scope of coverage for access work done to repair leakage.

In 2015, the insureds had a homeowners policy with the carrier. In August 2015, while the policy was in effect, the carrier provided the insureds with notice of a new endorsement that would take effect on September 27, 2015. The notice stated that the new endorsement would potentially reduce coverage, and that “[a]lthough not intended to change coverage, this change could potentially reduce or eliminate coverage depending on how it is interpreted and, in that regard, should be viewed as either an actual or potential reduction in or elimination of coverage.”

The insureds renewed their homeowners policies in the ensuing years, apparently without ever questioning this endorsement. The property damage at issue occurred in September 2018, when the insured homeowners had their plumber do certain repair work to fix a leak, including access work to get to damaged plumbing. The insureds allege that the carrier improperly refused to pay the full bill for the access work, while the carrier relied on the 2015 endorsement in justifying its lower than hoped for payment.

The homeowners brought individual and class action counts, seeking declaratory relief, as well as claims for breach of contract, violations of the Unfair Trade Practices and Consumer Protection Law (UTPCPL), the Unfair Insurance Practices Act (UIPA), Pennsylvania’s Unfair Claims Settlement Practices regulations (UCSP), and for statutory bad faith. The insurer moved to dismiss all claims.

Declaratory judgment and contract claims dismissed without prejudice

The insureds argued the 2015 endorsement was unconscionable and should be rendered void; but even if enforceable, it still required greater payment than the carrier made for the cost of the access work. The court, however, dismissed the declaratory judgment claim and breach of contract claim on these grounds, but without prejudice if plaintiffs could plead additional facts to support these claims.

Bad faith claim dismissed without prejudice

The essence of the insureds’ bad faith claims is that the notice accompanying the 2015 endorsement promised greater coverage, but gave less coverage. The court found this could not state a bad faith claim because these claims did not involve the denial of a benefit. “Section 8371 encompasses a variety of insurer conduct, but such conduct must be related to the denial of benefits.” Though “’the alleged bad faith need not be limited to the literal act of denying a claim, the essence of a bad faith claim must be the unreasonable and intentional (or reckless) denial of benefits.’”

In this case the “Plaintiffs’ allegations do not relate to the denial of coverage of the access bill, they relate to the Endorsement notice’s language and how Defendant engaged in alleged misrepresentation because of the purportedly confusing notice.” A “claim that the drafting of policy language was in bad faith is not actionable under Pennsylvania law….” In making this point, the court relied on Mitch’s Auto Service Center, Inc. v. State Automobile Mutual Insurance Co. As stated above, it relied on Toy v. Metropolitan Life for the fundamental point that statutory bad faith claims must include the denial of a benefit.

The court also specifically observed the complaint was “devoid of any facts indicating Defendant lacked a reasonable basis for denying benefits under the policy.” Likewise, there were no plausible allegations that the insurer “knew or recklessly disregarded its lack of reasonable basis.” The insureds argued that the 2015 notice language could be the basis of a bad faith claim. The court failed to see, however, “how that notice, provided to Plaintiffs three years prior to the water damage here, shows that Defendant knew or recklessly disregarded its alleged lack of reasonable basis in denying Plaintiffs’ entire costs for the plumber’s access bill.”

Still, the court dismissed without prejudice if the insureds could replead a plausible bad faith claim.

UIPA and UCSP regulations claims dismissed with prejudice

The insureds conceded that there is no private cause of action under Pennsylvania’s UIPA, 40 P.S. § 1171.1, or UCSPR, 31 Pa. Code §§ 146.1. The court cited Leach v. Northwestern Mut. Ins. Co., 262 F. App’x 455 (3d Cir. 2008), Swan Caterers, Inc. v. Nationwide Mut. Fire Ins. Co., No. 12-0024, 2012 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 162305, 2012 WL 5508371 (E.D. Pa. Nov. 13, 2012) and Connolly v. ReliaStar Life Ins. Co., No. 03-5444, 2006 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 83440, 2006 WL 3355184 (E.D. Pa. Nov. 13, 2006) for the proposition that there is no private cause of action under the UIPA or UCSP regulations, and the statute and regulations can only be enforced by the insurance commissioner.

UTPCPL claim dismissed without prejudice

The court dismissed the UTPCPL claim without prejudice, finding the 2015 notice did not constitute a deceptive act, because “the notice’s language explicitly states that the policyholder should treat the change as a reduction in coverage.” The court further found justifiable reliance was not pleaded, as there were no allegations that the insureds relied on any alleged misconduct causing them to purchase the policy.

Dates of Decision: March 27, 2020 (Report and Recommendation) and April 22, 2020 (District Court Order)

Velazquez v. State Farm Fire & Casualty Co., U.S. District Court Eastern District of Pennsylvania CIVIL ACTION NO. 19-cv-3128, 2020 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 55854 (E.D. Pa. Mar. 27, 2020) (Sitarski, M.J.) (Report and Recommendation), approved and adopted by the District Court (April 22, 2020) (Quiñones Alejandro, J.)

 

NO BAD FAITH: (1) NO BENEFIT DUE; (2) NO ESTOPPEL UNDER THE UIPA OR UCSP REGULATIONS; (3) AN OVERSIGHT CAUSING DELAY IS NOT BAD FAITH (Philadelphia Federal)

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The court described this as the case of the missing email. The insurance policy at issue covered various cars. The insured emailed its broker to add another vehicle to the policy. The broker claims it never got the email, and thus never asked the insurer to issue an endorsement adding the new car to the policy. As things sometimes go in life, the new car was involved in a collision, damaging another vehicle as well as its own new car.

The insured reported the claim. However, the insured identified its vehicle as one of existing cars listed in the policy, rather than the new unlisted vehicle. The insurer accepted coverage, and even paid damages to the other driver. The insurer later reversed itself on coverage once its appraiser determined the insured’s vehicle was not the car identified in the claim form, and was not covered under the policy.

The police report did list the correct vehicle. The insurer had the police report at the time it initially provided coverage, and only reversed itself when its appraiser realized that the damaged car was not the car on the claim form and was not listed in the policy.

The insured sued for breach of contract and bad faith, among other claims against the insurer as well as the broker. The insurer moved for summary judgment, which the court granted.

There is no breach of contract, or estoppel under the UIPA or UCSP regulations

First, there was no breach of contract, as the vehicle at issue never became part of the policy. The insured argued, however, that the insured was estopped from denying coverage under the Unfair Insurance Practices Act (UIPA) and the Unfair Claims Settlement Practices (UCSP) regulations governing “Standards for prompt, fair and equitable settlements applicable to insurers”. The insured relied on 31 Pa. Code § 146.7(a)(1), which states that, “Within 15 working days after receipt by the insurer of properly executed proofs of loss, the first-party claimant shall be advised of the acceptance or denial of the claim by the insurer.”

Judge Wolson rejected the statutory/regulatory argument for three reasons:

  1. There is no private right of action under the UIPA and UCSP regulations, and only Pennsylvania’s Insurance Commissioner can enforce the UIPA and UCSP regulations.

  2. The policy itself did not incorporate the UIPA or UCSP obligations or impose those obligations on the insurer. “Absent the incorporation of these obligations into the Policy, their potential violation does not breach the Policy.”

  3. The doctrines of waiver or estoppel cannot “create an insurance contract where none existed.”

THERE IS NO BAD FAITH

  1. The broker is not an insurer subject to the bad faith statute

First, the court recognized that there was no sustainable statutory bad faith action against the broker because it was not an insurer.

  1. There is no bad faith where no benefit is denied

Next, as to the insurer, “To prevail on a bad faith claim, a plaintiff must present clear and convincing evidence that, among other things, an insurer ‘did not have a reasonable basis for denying benefits under the policy’ or that an insurer committed a ‘frivolous or unfounded refusal to pay proceeds of a policy.’” Because the insurer had no contractual obligation to pay its refusal could not have been unreasonable, and the claim failed.

  1. The UIPA and UCSP regulations do no prevent changing a coverage decision based on new information

The court rejected another argument based on the UIPA and UCSP regulations cited above. The insured argued the failure to pay was unreasonable once the insurer accepted coverage. The court found, however, the UCSP regulations did not “prevent an insurer from changing a coverage determination based on new information.”

More importantly to the court, the insured adduced no case law adding such a gloss to section 146.7, i.e. a mandate that once coverage was accepted it could never be denied under any circumstances. Thus, it was reasonable for the insurer to interpret that regulation to permit an insurer to revise a coverage decision based on new information.

  1. A Delay based on an Oversight is not the Basis for Bad Faith

Finally, any delay in revising its coverage determination was likewise not bad faith. Citing the 2007 DeWalt decision, the court observed that an “insurer’s actions in allegedly delaying investigation did not constitute bad faith under Pennsylvania law [when] there was no evidence that such delay was deliberate or knowing, or was unreasonable.”

While the carrier “probably could have been more diligent” in determining which vehicle was involved in the collision by looking at the police report earlier, “an insurer ‘need not show that the process used to reach its conclusion was flawless or that its investigatory methods eliminated possibilities at odds with its conclusion.’” There was nothing in the record to establish the insurer “acted with reckless disregard of its obligations or otherwise fell so short that it acted in bad faith.”

Date of Decision: April 1, 2020

Live Face on Web, LLC v. Merchants Insurance Group, U.S. District Court Eastern District of Pennsylvania Case No. 2:19-cv-00528-JDW, 2020 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 56852 (E.D. Pa. April 1, 2020) (Wolson, J.)

Our thanks to attorney Daniel Cummins of the excellent Tort Talk Blog for bringing this case to our attention.  We also note the Tort Talk Blog’s three recent posts on post-Koken motions to sever and stay bad faith claims in the Western District, York County, and Lancaster County.

WHERE THERE IS NO DUTY TO DEFEND THERE IS NO STATUTORY BAD FAITH; NO COMMON LAW BAD FAITH WHERE NO BREACH OF CONTRACT (Western District)

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The court determined there was no coverage due under an additional insured endorsement. Thus the insured lost on its breach of contract and declaratory judgments claims. It likewise failed to salvage its bad faith claims.

In addressing the bad faith claim, the court relied on the Third Circuit’s recent decision in 631 N. Broad Street v. Commonwealth Land Title, observing “that where there is ‘no duty to defend, there could be no [statutory] bad faith claim against’ the insurer.”

The insured tried to evade this result by asserting it still had a common law bad faith claim. However, the only common law bad faith cause of action available in Pennsylvania arises out of the insurance contract. If the contract claim fails, the common law bad faith claim fails of necessity. Thus, “[b]ecause the Court dismisses [the] breach-of-contract claim based on lack of potential for coverage, so too must it dismiss a subsumed claim of common law bad faith.”

On the common law bad faith holding, the court relied upon the Eastern District decisions in CRS Auto Parts and Tubman, and the Middle District decisions in Bukofsi and Porter.

Date of Decision: March 13, 2020

NVR, Inc. v. Mutual Benefit Insurance Co., U.S. District Court Western District of Pennsylvania No. 2:19-cv-26-NR, 2020 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 44135 (W.D. Pa. Mar. 13, 2020) (Ranjan, J.)

WHERE POLICY DOES NOT COVER CLAIM, INSURER HAS A REASONABLE BASIS TO DENY BENEFITS AS A MATTER OF LAW (Philadelphia Federal)

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The case involved a policy interpretation dispute, specifically focusing on an exception to an exclusion. The carrier denied coverage, and the insured sued for a declaratory judgment, breach of contract, and bad faith.

The exclusion at issue plainly applied to condominiums, but also included an exception for single-family dwellings that were not tract homes, condominiums, or townhouse projects. The insured argued that the exception encompassed three types of structures: single family homes that are not tract homes, and condominiums, and townhouse projects. The insurer argued that the exception only applied to single family dwellings that were not part of tract homes, condominiums or townhouse projects.

The court agreed with the insurer. It would be unreasonable to read the policy as excluding coverage for condominiums, and then excepting condominiums from the exclusion in the next breath. Otherwise, this would make the exclusion language surplussage.

After making this finding, the court determined that there was no breach of contract, and that the insurer should be granted a declaratory judgment in its favor.

The court then granted judgment to the insurer on the bad faith claim. “Given that the policy does not cover the … claim, [the insurer] did not, as a matter of law, lack a reasonable basis for denying benefits under the policy.”

Date of Decision: February 25, 2020

Elite Restoration, Inc. v. First Mercury Ins. Co., U.S. Dist. Court Eastern District of Pennsylvania CIVIL ACTION NO. 19-2215, 2020 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 31611 (E.D. Pa. Feb. 25, 2020) (Joyner, J.)

LACK OF COVERAGE CONSTITUTES UNDISPUTED EVIDENCE OF REASONABLE BASIS TO DENY CLAIM, AND WARRANTS REJECTION OF BAD FAITH CAUSE OF ACTION (Philadelphia Federal)

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The loss at issue was the result of intentional conduct by the named insured’s son, in this tragic matter. The son was also an insured under the policy.

The court found the named insured (actually his estate) could not make out a prima facie case for coverage because the loss was not accidental, and the intentional conduct was the act of an insured. Alternatively, the court found the intentional loss exclusion applied. For these reasons, the court granted summary judgment on the breach of contract claim.

As to bad faith count, the court first reiterates that the insurance coverage claims are barred under the policy. Next, “[t]he Court therefore concludes that undisputed evidence demonstrates that defendant had a reasonable basis for denying plaintiff’s claim. The bad faith claim is therefore rejected.”

Thus, summary judgment was granted on all counts.

Date of Decision: January 30, 2020

Tartour v. Safeco Insurance Co., U.S. District Court Eastern District of Pennsylvania CIVIL ACTION NO. 17-1896, 2020 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 16271, 2020 WL 489467 (E.D. Pa. Jan. 30, 2020) (DuBois, J.)

NO BAD FAITH WHERE EXCLUSION APPLIES AND NO COVERAGE DUE (Western District)

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Plaintiff loaned her car to her boyfriend. Unknown to her, the boyfriend’s license was suspended. He got into an accident, and the carrier denied coverage based on an exclusion for drivers with suspended licenses. Plaintiff sued for bad faith and breach of contract. The parties filed cross motions for summary judgment. The court granted the insurer’s motion.

The dispute centered on the policy exclusion. The court analyzed the exclusion in detail based on the policy language and facts of the case, finding the exclusion applied. The court rejected the insured’s piecemeal policy reading as contrary to governing standards requiring the policy to be viewed “in its entirety, giving effect to all of its provisions,” with the policy’s words “construed in their natural, plain, and ordinary sense”.

Thus, the insured’s “attempts to read ambiguity into [policy] sections where none exist [] cannot demonstrate bad faith or breach of contract as a matter of law.”

Date of Decision: December 20, 2019

Lewandowski v. Nationwide Mutual Insurance Co., U.S. District Court Western District of Pennsylvania Civil Action No. 18-1441, 2019 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 218713, 2019 WL 7037587 (W.D. Pa. Dec. 20, 2019) (Bissoon, J.)

BAD FAITH REQUIRES DENIAL OF A BENEFIT, EXCEPT IN LIMITED CIRCUMSTANCES; NO SEPARATE BREACH OF GOOD FAITH ACTION (Philadelphia federal)

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To paraphrase from the summary below: Though courts have extended the concept of bad faith beyond an insured’s denial of a claim in several limited areas, the essence of a bad faith claim must be the unreasonable and intentional or reckless denial of benefits.

A dispute between the insured and insurer settled for $237,000. During the post-settlement drafting process, the insurer included a term in the settlement agreement making the insured’s mortgagee a payee on the settlement check. The insured objected, but the carrier responded the policy required it to include the payee. It refused to issue the settlement check without the mortgagee and the parties were at loggerheads.

The insured filed a new action against the carrier, seeking to enforce the settlement agreement without the mortgagee’s inclusion. The insured brought a breach of contract claim, as well as a separate breach of the duty of good faith and fair dealing in connection with the settlement agreement. The carrier moved to dismiss the good faith and fair dealing count.

The court dismissed that count, following the principle a breach of the covenant of good faith and fair dealing is subsumed within the contract claim, and cannot state a distinct cause of action. “Such subsuming occurs when ‘the actions forming the basis of the breach of contract claim are essentially the same as the actions forming the basis of the bad faith claim.’” Here, both counts arose out of the refusal to remove the mortgagee from the settlement payment.

The court also noted there was no separate tort claim for bad faith in Pennsylvania.

Finally, the court rejected the notion that the good faith count could survive if treated as a statutory bad faith claim. It observed that the case arose from an alleged breach of a settlement agreement, not a violation of the insurance policy. The issue here was the insurer’s including the mortgagee on the payment check, not the denial of a benefit, i.e., the carrier was ready and willing to make a payment under the policy.

As the court states:

Critically, while Plaintiff does claim that [the carrier] “refus[ed] to make payment of a settlement amount within 60 days as required by the policy of insurance,” it is clear from Plaintiff’s own recitation of the facts that what Plaintiff means by “refus[al] to make payment” amounts to Plaintiff’s refusal to accept a settlement check naming the mortgagee as a payee, rather than a denial of benefits under the policy. Though “Courts have extended the concept of ‘bad faith’ beyond an insured’s denial of a claim in several limited areas,” … “the essence of a bad faith claim must be the unreasonable and intentional (or reckless) denial of benefits….” [Emphasis in original] As such, Section 8371 “do[es] not apply to [mere] disputes over contract terms.” … Tellingly, Plaintiff identifies no case in which a Pennsylvania court or a court interpreting Pennsylvania law has found that Section 8371 encompasses the type of settlement dispute at issue here. Count II of Plaintiff’s Amended Complaint is therefore dismissed for failure to state a claim.

Date of Decision: November 18, 2019

Purvi, LLC v. Nat’l Fire & Marine Insurance Co., U. S. District Court Eastern District of Pennsylvania CIVIL ACTION NO. 19-4250, 2019 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 199469 (E.D. Pa. Nov. 18, 2019) (Beetlestone, J.)

AS RACCOONS ARE NOT PEOPLE, THERE IS NO COVERAGE, AND NO BAD FAITH (Western District)

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The insured argued the carrier’s policy provided coverage for property damage caused by raccoons. Specifically, it asserted the policy’s language covering vandalism and malicious mischief applied, i.e., the raccoons should be treated as vandals having malicious intent in wreaking havoc inside the insured dwelling.  This reading was possible because the terms vandalism and malicious mischief were undefined in the policy, and Pennsylvania’s courts had never determined if those terms could apply to animals.

The court rejected these arguments, and the notion that the absence of definition in the policy could open the door to meanings outside of commonly understood usage.

The court analyzed, at significant length, common law, dictionary definitions, and statutes using the terms vandalism or malicious mischief.  The court concluded that vandalism could only be the act of human beings. Likewise, animals could not have malicious intent. Rather, malice as used in an insurance contract, or anywhere in the law, is a human quality. As the court observed, “[b]y its very language criminal mischief, like all crimes, requires a human actor. Animals are subject only to the laws of nature, not the Pennsylvania Crimes Code or law governing human conduct.”

The court cited a New Mexico case, involving a bobcat, reaching a similar conclusion. The  court quoted the New Mexico judge’s poetic conclusion summarizing his opinion on feline mentation, which the Pennsylvania court found good for raccoons too:

“Alas, it is written in the law

That an animal with the paw

Does not have the mind

To do the damage of this kind.

And so, I’m sorry, the Plaintiff won’t get paid.

That’s how the contract was made.

This policy does not apply

When the bobcat runs awry.”

In sum, there was no coverage. Thus, there could be no bad faith.

[The court did not mention that the original “Vandals” were human beings, most famous for sacking Rome in 455 (hence the term vandalism).

For some interesting reading on raccoons, this recent article describes the destructive risks raccoons pose to the world, and how they too have now reached Italy.]

Date of Decision: September 19, 2019

Capital Flip, LLC v. American Modern Select Insurance Co., U. S. District Court Western District of Pennsylvania Civil Action No. 2:19-cv-180, 2019 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 165422, 2019 WL 4536164 (W.D. Pa. Sept. 19, 2019) (Stickman, J.)