PENNSYLVANIA SUPREME COURT RULES MOTIVE OF SELF-INTEREST OR ILL-WILL NOT AN ELEMENT OF STATUTORY BAD FAITH CASE (Pennsylvania Supreme Court)

Print Friendly

Since 2007, Pennsylvania’s Superior Court has taken the position that proving statutory bad faith includes two elements: (1) the absence of a reasonable basis to deny a benefit and (2) knowledge or reckless disregard of the fact there was no reasonable basis to deny coverage. The elements were originally stated in Terletsky v. Prudential Property & Cas. Ins. Co., 649 A.2d 680 (Pa. Super. Ct. 1994). The Terletsky Court had also discussed the concepts of a carrier’s “motive of self-interest or ill-will,” and some courts concluded this was a third element of proof. The Superior Court rejected that position in 2007, holding that self-interest or ill-will (sometimes generically referred to as malice) can be evidence used to prove the second element, but was not an element of proof in itself. However, the position that self-interest or ill-will was a required third element of proof has continued in some Pennsylvania Federal District Court opinions.

Today, in Rancosky v. Washington National Ins. Co., Pennsylvania’s Supreme Court adopted the Superior Court’s position.

The Supreme Court stated:

“we adopt the two-part test articulated by the Superior Court in Terletsky v. Prudential Property & Cas. Ins. Co., 649 A.2d 680 (Pa. Super. 1994), which provides that, in order to recover in a bad faith action, the plaintiff must present clear and convincing evidence (1) that the insurer did not have a reasonable basis for denying benefits under the policy and (2) that the insurer knew of or recklessly disregarded its lack of a reasonable basis. Additionally, we hold that proof of an insurance company’s motive of self-interest or ill-will is not a prerequisite to prevailing in a bad faith claim under Section 8371, as argued by Appellant. While such evidence is probative of the second Terletsky prong, we hold that evidence of the insurer’s knowledge or recklessness as to its lack of a reasonable basis in denying policy benefits is sufficient.”

More to follow.

0 Responses to “PENNSYLVANIA SUPREME COURT RULES MOTIVE OF SELF-INTEREST OR ILL-WILL NOT AN ELEMENT OF STATUTORY BAD FAITH CASE (Pennsylvania Supreme Court)”


Comments are currently closed.