JULY 2017 BAD FAITH CASES: COURT DECLINES TO CONSIDER MERITS OF ASSIGNED BAD FAITH CLAIM BECAUSE STATUTE OF LIMITATIONS HAD RUN (Western District)

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In 2007, the insured was involved in a motor vehicle accident, injuring another driver. The injured party filed a negligence action against the insured. The insurer sent a 2007 letter declining to defend or indemnify the insured. In 2008, the insurer filed a declaratory judgment action, claiming that it did not have a duty to defend or indemnify the insured. The court entered a consent order that the insurer owed no duty to defend or indemnify.

Around the same time-period, the injured party separately filed her own declaratory judgment against the insurer, arguing that the insurer was obligated to defend and indemnify the insured. This second declaratory judgment action did not assert claims for breach of contract or bad faith, and there was no assignment of such claims by the insured to the injured plaintiff. In February 2009, the injured party was given leave to withdraw this second declaratory judgment action, without prejudice.

The insured passed away in 2015. In 2016, after trial, the court entered judgment in favor of the injured party in the original 2007 negligence action, for a sum in excess of $1 Million. The estate assigned the injured party any and all of its rights, claims, demands, and causes of action against the insurer, including claims for breach of contract and bad faith.

The injured party subsequently filed an action against the insurer. The claims included breach of contract and statutory bad faith claim, as well as a request for declaratory relief. The court granted summary judgment on the assigned breach of contract and bad faith claims, though not as to the injured party’s own declaratory judgment count.

An assignee stands in the assignor shoes. Any causes of action the insured had for breach of contract and bad faith accrued when the insurer conveyed a letter denying any duty to defend and indemnify the 2007 negligence action (or, at the latest, in 2008, when the court entered the consent order). The court stated that any bad faith claim had to be raised no later than 2009 (under the two year statute of limitations governing statutory bad faith claims) or by 2011 for the breach of contract claim.

The court concluded: “In order to advance timely claims for breach of contract/bad faith, under the facts here, [the insured] would had to have filed suit and challenged that coverage denial in the 2008 ‘second’ declaratory judgment suit by seeking an assignment to include the breach of contract/bad faith claims at that time. Instead, [the insured] brought only a declaratory judgment action.”

As the bad faith claim was not filed within two years after the initial denial of coverage, the court found that the claim was time-barred.

Date of Decision: May 22, 2017

Falo v. Travelers Personal Insurance Co., No. 17cv0143, 2017 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 77425 (W.D. Pa. May 22, 2017) (Schwab, J.)

 

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