MARCH 2018 BAD FAITH CASES: NEGLIGENCE IS NOT BAD FAITH; SUMMARY JUDGMENT CANNOT BE DEFEATED WHERE RECORD CONTRADICTS BALD ALLEGATIONS OF BAD FAITH (Philadelphia Federal)

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

In this UIM case, the actual record warranted summary judgment for the insurer, despite allegations of bad faith to the contrary.

The insured submitted a UIM claim for injuries sustained to his elbow. The insured recovered $100,000 from the tortfeasor’s insurer, and then requested maximum UIM benefits of $200,000. Three weeks before the accident, the insured had injured the elbow when he fell at his home.

The insured’s counsel initially attempted to contact a claims specialist who no longer worked for insurer. Nearly four months later, the insurer responded that that this adjuster no longer worked there, but the UIM claim was being transferred to another claims specialist immediately. The insurer did immediately begin processing the claim, and continually requested additional medical records from the insured, to no avail.

The insured filed suit for bad faith and breach of contract, and the insurer moved for summary judgment on the bad faith claim, which was granted for the following reasons:

Negligence is not bad faith.

  1. The insured argued bad faith in delaying the UIM investigation for four months. The Court ruled that in light of the fact that the initial demand letter was sent to the wrong person, the delay in opening the claim amounted to mere negligence, not bad faith.

The record contradicts the insured’s alleged bases for bad faith.

  1. The insured argued a failure to tender reasonable UIM benefits. The Court rejected this argument, stating that a partial valuation of the claim had neither been made nor requested by the insured.

  2. The insured argued the insurer used dilatory tactics and failed to investigate the claim. The Court found this “patently false,” because the record showed the insurer continually communicated with the insured and retained three separate physicians who all concluded the insured suffered no additional elbow injury due to the auto accident.

  3. The insured argued the claim was frivolously denied. The Court rejected this argument, citing the thorough investigation conducted by the insurer.

Date of Decision: March 6, 2018

Smith v. LM General Insurance Co., CIVIL ACTION NO. 17-02310, 2018 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 35773 (E.D. Pa. Mar. 6, 2018) (Pappert, J.)

0 Responses to “MARCH 2018 BAD FAITH CASES: NEGLIGENCE IS NOT BAD FAITH; SUMMARY JUDGMENT CANNOT BE DEFEATED WHERE RECORD CONTRADICTS BALD ALLEGATIONS OF BAD FAITH (Philadelphia Federal)”


Comments are currently closed.