NO BAD FAITH UNDER NEW JERSEY LAW WHERE INSURED CANNOT ESTABLISH A BREACH OF THE INSURANCE CONTRACT (New Jersey Appellate Division) (Unpublished)

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The insured had a long-term care policy. The carrier denied coverage and the insured sued for breach of contract, bad faith, and breach of the duty to act in good faith. The trial court granted summary judgment on all counts, and the Appellate Division affirmed.

The crux of the case involved policy interpretation and the carrier’s alleged failure to review a physician letter/plan. The trial court found the policy was unambiguous, i.e., it was not susceptible to two reasonable readings of the same policy language, one of which favored the insured over the insurer. Rather, the language was clear, sufficiently prominent, and written in plain language. That language put the insured’s claims outside the policy’s coverage terms.

To the extent the physician letter may have arguably come within the policy’s coverage, the evidence showed that letter was never provided to the carrier before suit. Further, there was no other evidence showing the insurer acted unreasonably.

As to bad faith, “[t]he trial court also found that the bad faith claim failed under the ‘fairly debatable’ standard, since plaintiff could not establish the breach of contract claim as a matter of law.” As stated above, the Appellate Division affirmed on all counts.

Date of Decision: November 12, 2019

Cooper v. CNA Insurance Co., Superior Court of New Jersey Appellate Division DOCKET NO. A-4824-17T4, 2019 N.J. Super. Unpub. LEXIS 2316, 2019 WL 5884584 (App. Div. Nov. 12, 2019) (Koblitz, Mawla, Whipple, JJ.) (unpublished)

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