OCTOBER 2018 BAD FAITH CASES: ALLEGED DISPARITY IN PROPERTY DAMAGE ESTIMATES WENT BEYOND THE ARGUMENT THAT THE INSURER’S ESTIMATE WAS LOW BUT REASONABLE; ALLEGATIONS IN COMPLAINT NOT CONCLUSORY AND NEEDED TO BE EXPLORED IN DISCOVERY (Middle District)

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Negligent driving resulted in a truck crashing into the insured’s home. Her carrier evaluated the damage at less than $2,500, which came to less than $600 after deductibles. The tortfeasor’s carrier evaluated the damages at $60,000 based on a finding of structural damage, and the plaintiff’s public adjuster and another entity came in at $40,000. The insurer did not revise its estimate, and the insured brought suit for breach of contract and bad faith. The insurer unsuccessfully moved to dismiss the bad faith claim.

The case provides an overview of: the elements of statutory bad faith; that negligence does not constitute bad faith; the demanding heights of the clear and convincing evidence standard; and some types of conduct that may constitute bad faith, e.g., “a frivolous or unfounded refusal to pay, failure to investigate the facts, failure to communicate with the insured, failure to engage in settlement negotiations, and unreasonable delay.”

The carrier had a representative and engineer inspect the house, and argued that its number was the result of these inspections. It argued that it was willing to pay the claim, and that simply because the insured disagrees with the number offered this does not constitute bad faith. The insurer relied on the principle that low but reasonable offers cannot constitute bad faith. The insurer also argued that the complaint contained only conclusory allegations of bad faith, and should be dismissed on those grounds as well.

The court disagreed, finding the facts pleaded sufficient to state a claim. Further, the court did not characterize the pleadings as supporting the conclusion the insurer’s estimate was low but reasonable. Rather, plaintiff alleged that the extreme disparity between the insurer’s estimate and the other estimates “suggests much more than mere negligence.” The insured also attached exhibits “to show the extent of her damages and the total amount of her damages based on her estimates.”

The court also recognized that other allegations require discovery to determine if they can be substantiated, e.g., her allegation that the insurer “initially misrepresented pertinent facts of her policy provisions regarding coverage and that [the insurer] mislead her.” The issue of whether the house suffered structural damage, as stated in the $60,000 estimate, also requires discovery, as such evidence “would support plaintiff’s bad faith allegation that [the insurer] was unreasonable in failing to reinvestigate and reevaluate her damages.”
Date of Decision: September 28, 2018

Meiser v. State Farm Fire & Cas. Co., U. S. District Court Middle District of Pennsylvania CIVIL ACTION NO. 3:17-2366, 2018 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 167991 (M.D. Pa. Sept. 28, 2018) (Mannion, J.)

 

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