Archive for the 'PA – Reserves' Category

OUR 1800TH POST: (1) RESERVES DISCOVERABLE; (2) COMMUNICATIONS RETAINING COUNSEL NOT DISCOVERABLE; (3) ISO CLAIM HISTORY REPORT DISCOVERABLE; (4) ASSET REPORT ON TORTFEASOR NOT DISCOVERABLE; (5) CLAIM EVALUATION REPORT ONLY HAS LIMITED WORK PRODUCT PROTECTION; (6) INTERNAL NOTES FULLY PROTECTED ON ATTORNEY COMMUNICATIONS, BUT LIMITED WORK PRODUCT PROTECTION; (7) DEPOSITIONS MAY INQUIRE INTO AREAS WITH ONLY LIMITED WORK PRODUCT PROTECTION (Philadelphia Federal)

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It has been nearly 15 years since our first bad faith blog post, summarizing an opinion by the late Judge Albert Sheppard.  Today’s summary is our 1,800th post

This Eastern District opinion addresses discovery issues in a UIM bad faith case, including document production and issues arising out of plaintiff seeking to depose the insurer’s claim adjuster and corporate designee.  Magistrate Judge Perkin had already addressed numerous discovery issues in this case in an earlier opinion, summarized here, and now addresses the remaining issues after conducting an in camera review of certain documents on the insurer’s privilege log.

Reserves discoverable in bad faith valuation dispute

Magistrate Judge Perkin observed, “District Courts within the Third Circuit are split on the question of whether reserves are discoverable in bad faith cases.”  He relied on Middle District Magistrate Judge Carlson’s Barnard decision, summarized here, holding that in bad faith cases, reserves are discoverable if the bad faith claim is based on a valuation dispute, rather than outright coverage denial.  As the present case involved a valuation dispute, reserves were discoverable.

Magistrate Judge Perkin further rejected the argument that the reserves were protected work product.  Applying the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure, he found that the insurer did “not argue that its reserves were prepared in anticipation of litigation or other than in the normal course of business.”

Internal emails regarding receipt of this lawsuit and assignment to legal counsel not discoverable

The insurer “withheld internal emails regarding receipt of the lawsuit and assignment to its legal counsel. Defendant’s privilege log indicates that these documents were withheld on the grounds that the information is ‘work product, mental impression, confidential, and post litigation.’ After in camera review, this Court finds that the documents have been appropriately withheld. These documents, dated after the lawsuit was filed, are protected by both attorney-client privilege and the work-product doctrine as the communications were made with the purpose of seeking legal advice and discuss litigation strategy.”

ISO claim search report discoverable

“[T]he ISO Claims Search Database is a nationwide database utilized by insurance companies to track claims history and detect fraud. Defendant withheld the report on Plaintiff’s claims history on the basis that it is not relevant.” The court found the information “relevant to Plaintiff’s bad faith claim to the extent that it is a factor Defendant considered in evaluating Plaintiff’s Underinsured Motorist Claim.”

Asset report for consent to settle/waiver of UIM subrogation purposes not discoverable

Defendant withheld the asset search of the tortfeasor in the underlying motor vehicle accident action, on the basis of irrelevance and confidentiality. The court agreed it was irrelevant to the bad faith claim at issue

Insurer’s evaluation report for plaintiff’s UIM claim: no attorney-client privilege protection and limited work product protection

The insurer withheld its evaluation report on the UIM claim based on “work product, mental impression, attorney-client, confidential, and post litigation.” Magistrate Judge Perkin found “these documents consist of not only the final evaluation of Plaintiff’s claim prepared by claims personnel … but also a detailed history of all updates made by claims adjusters to the report beginning on … the date Plaintiff settled with the tortfeasor.”

First, the court found these documents were not subject to the attorney-client privilege. “[T]he privilege bars discovery of confidential communications made between attorneys and clients for the purpose of obtaining or providing legal assistance to the client. …  The privilege does not apply to the ‘disclosure of the underlying facts by those who communicated with the attorney.’” “The evaluation report contains no communications between Defendant and its counsel. Rather, the report contains a series of notations regarding the claim by the claims adjuster….”

Next, Magistrate Judge Perkin dove deep into an analysis of the work product doctrine, addressing the difficult question of when the normal duty to investigate a claim turned into a period where the insurer reasonably anticipated litigation.

Thus, to determine the work-product doctrine’s applicability:

  1. A court must “first establish when Defendant reasonably anticipated litigation.”

  2. “The party asserting work product protection must demonstrate that it subjectively anticipated litigation, and that the anticipation was objectively reasonable.”

  3. “While the court must initially focus on the state of mind of the party preparing, or ordering preparation, of the document, that person’s anticipation of litigation must be objectively reasonable for the work product protection to apply.”

  4. “A party’s anticipation of litigation is objectively reasonable if ‘there existed an identifiable specific claim or impending litigation when the materials were prepared.’”

Magistrate Judge Perkin looked for guidance in Judge Sanchez’s 2014 Borgia opinion, summarized here, and Judge Leeson’s 2016 Wagner decision, summarized here.

In the present case, plaintiff’s counsel first demanded policy limits on January 12, 2018, and the insurer engaged counsel to investigate and evaluate the claim on April 19, 2018.  After being retained, the insurer’s counsel conducted a statement under oath, subpoenaed medical records and assisted in obtaining an IME.

“On July 20, 2018, after the Statement Under Oath was completed, Plaintiff’s counsel again made a demand for policy limits, though she made no threat or mention of litigation. Reviewing the e-mails between counsel, it appears that, from July 20, 2018 through February 27, 2019, the communications involved only requests for authorization of medical records and scheduling of the independent medical examination. On August 26, 2019, the independent medical examination occurred. Shortly after, on September 3, 2019, Plaintiff filed this lawsuit.”

Counsel’s communications indicated plaintiff sought full UIM limits but never threatened litigation. Further, “the communications between counsel from July 20, 2018 through February 7, 2019 concerned continued requests for medical records and authorizations to fully assess Plaintiff’s claim.”

Further, this was not a case where insurer’s claim valuation and the policy limit demand were so far apart that a reasonable insurer would believe litigation could arise, until the August 26, 2019 IME. Magistrate Judge Perkin found it was only at the time the IME concluded in August 2019 that it was “likely that Defendant had determined Plaintiff’s demand for payment in the amount of the policy limit exceeded its expected offer for settlement.” Thus, he held the insurer reasonably anticipated litigation no later than the date the IME concluded, and ordered production of unredacted claim handling entries on the evaluation reports prior to that date.

Internal file notes reflecting communications with counsel protected, but those based on work product are only partially protected

The insurer redacted all information in its internal file notes concerning communications with legal counsel, UIM strategy and evaluation, and claim handling on the basis of “work product, attorney-client, confidential, mental impression, not relevant, and post litigation.” The redactions “appear to be an account of all updates made on the handling of Plaintiff’s claim by the claims adjuster….” Based on the earlier work product analysis, “any entries made prior to August 26, 2019 redacted on the basis of the work-product doctrine are discoverable and must be produced.”

This included the adjuster’s summary of the insured’s statement under oath.

“Any redactions made due to the attorney-client privilege are appropriately redacted, and need not be produced, as they are summaries of communications between the claims adjuster, in-house counsel, and outside counsel.”

Scope of permissible subjects for inquiry at deposition of corporate designee and adjuster

As stated above, plaintiff could not direct questions to either deponent about attorney-client communications.  Plaintiff could ask about underlying facts, even if those facts were also communicated to counsel for counsel’s consideration in evaluating the matter, regarding what facts were considered in not offering policy limits.

As to work product, per the above reasoning, “Plaintiff’s counsel must limit any questions under this matter for examination to the time period before August 26, 2019.”

Date of Decision:  May 27, 2021

Sanchez v. State Farm Mutual Auto Insurance Company, U.S. District Court Eastern District of Pennsylvania No. CV 19-4016, 2021 WL 2156367 (E.D. Pa. May 27, 2021) (Perkin, M.J.)

COURT PERMITS DISCOVERY OF DOCUMENTS AND EMAILS THAT WERE NOT ACTUALLY PRIVILEGED SIMPLY BECAUSE THEY MENTION LEGAL COUNSEL; LIMITS CLAIMS REP DISCOVERY TO MENTAL IMPRESSIONS NOT PREPARED IN ANTICIPATION OF LITIGATION; AND ALLOWS DISCOVERY OF RESERVES IN VALUATION BAD FAITH CASE (Middle District)

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This Pennsylvania federal opinion addresses bad faith discovery disputes.  The case involved first party fire damage losses. Plaintiffs sought various claims file documents, and the insurer produced a privilege log in connection with its objections and redactions. Magistrate Judge Saporito reviewed the documents in camera before ruling.

He identified four areas at issue: “(1) communications regarding expenses incurred and paid by the defendant; (2) communications with counsel; (3) mental impressions; and (4) other financial information.”

  1. Approvals of Legal Fees and Expenses Discoverable

“In general, the mere facts of legal consultation or employment, client identities, attorney’s fees and the scope and nature of employment are not privileged.” Further, “[a]ttorney billing records may be privileged if they reveal the nature of the services rendered.”

Here, documents reflecting only that legal fees and expenses were approved, without any reference to attorney-client communications or the nature of the work performed, are not privileged. Rather, they are administrative in nature, whether involving pre or post-litigation approvals.

  1. Emails strings at issue were not privileged

Under Pennsylvania law, a party seeking the protection of the attorney-client privilege must show there was “’(1) a communication (2) made between privileged persons (3) in confidence (4) for the purpose of obtaining or providing legal assistance for the client.’”

Here, the court had to review a number of email strings.  Judge Saporito observed that “’each version of an email string (i.e. a forward or reply of a previous email message) must be considered as a separate, unique document.’” Further, in preparing a privilege log, “’each message of the string which is privileged must be separately logged in order to claim privilege in that particular document.’” In practice, this “’simply requires that Defendants ensure that each withheld email within a string be logged in some fashion at least once.’”

The emails at issue all referenced legal counsel in some way, but were not themselves communications with counsel. Nor did they disclosure any attorney-client communications.  Thus, the attorney-client privilege did not apply.

  1. Claims representatives’ mental impressions prepared in anticipation of litigation were protected as work-product

“Mental impressions and opinions of a party and its agents are not generally protected by the work product doctrine unless they are prepared in anticipation of litigation.” “To that end, ‘work product prepared in the ordinary course of business is not immune from discovery.’”

Here, the insurer redacted documents in the claims file that included its claims representatives’ impressions, conclusions, and opinions. Judge Saporito had to make the fact-specific inquiry into when these representatives anticipated litigation.  He recognized that prudence requires parties to anticipate litigation, and to start preparing themselves for litigation at some time before the litigation is actually instituted.

Judge Saporito found a number of redactions warranted because the claims representatives anticipated litigation.  On the other hand, he ordered other redactions eliminated, and documents produced, where: (1) there wasn’t actually any work product, (2) the materials only involved an analysis of general business practices concerning “the investigation and evaluation of future, notional property claims involving suspicious circumstances,” and (3) the representative’s notations were made on an insurance application, which was clearly not done at a time when litigation would be anticipated.

  1. Reserves discoverable in bad faith action over valuation

Judge Saporito observed that courts in the Third Circuit are split over whether reserves are discoverable in bad faith cases. He followed Middle District Magistrate Judge Carlson’s Barnard decision, summarized here, for the proposition that the prevailing position favors discoverability if the bad faith claim at issue “relates to an insurer’s failure to settle or where there is a discrepancy regarding the value of the claim.” By contrast, if the bad faith claim does not involve valuation or liability estimates, reserve information is irrelevant.

The present case involved a valuation dispute, and Judge Saporito ordered production of reserve information.

Finally, Judge Saporito ordered production of certain information concerning the agent who sold plaintiffs the policy at issue.  He qualified this order by stating he was not ruling on whether this information could ultimately be admissible at trial.

Date of Decision:  March 5, 2021

Mazer v. Frederick Mutual Insurance Company, U.S. District Court Middle District of Pennsylvania No. 1:19-CV-01838, 2021 WL 850984 (M.D. Pa. Mar. 5, 2021) (Saporito, M.J.)

INSURER NOT REQUIRED TO PRODUCE PERSONNEL FILE, BUT IS REQUIRED TO (1) PROVIDE CORPORATE DESIGNEE FOR DEPOSITION, (2) PRODUCE MANUALS AND TRAINING MATERIALS WITHIN CERTAIN TIME/GEOGRAPHIC LIMITS, AND (3) PROVIDE CLAIMS FILES TO THE COURT FOR IN CAMERA REVIEW ON PRIVILEGE AND WORK PRODUCT (Philadelphia Federal)

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The instant dispute involves the depositions of the claims handler and a corporate designee, as well as the scope of document discovery. The insurer made extensive objections to document requests accompanying the notices of deposition, and the any deposition of a corporate designee.  These are described in detail below.

This UIM bad faith case survived an earlier motion to dismiss, and was now proceeding on the merits before Magistrate Judge Perkin.  (Judge Leeson’s 2020 decision allowing the case to proceed is summarized here.)

General Discovery Principles

Magistrate Judge Perkin set out the basic principles guiding his decision:

  1. Rule 26 allows parties to “obtain discovery regarding any nonprivileged matter that is relevant to any party’s claim or defense and proportional to the needs of the case[.]”

  2. “Relevance is a broad concept that encompass[es] any matter that bears on, or that reasonably could lead to other matter that could bear on, any issue that is or may be in the case.”

  3. “As an initial matter, therefore, all relevant material is discoverable unless an applicable evidentiary privilege is asserted. The presumption that such matter is discoverable, however, is defeasible.”

  4. “While the discovery rules are meant to be construed liberally, the responses sought [by a party] must comport with the traditional notions of relevancy and must not impose an undue burden on the responding party.”

  5. “To determine the scope of discoverable information under Rule 26(b)(1), the Court looks initially to the pleadings.”

  6. “In deciding which materials are discoverable and which are not, a district court must further distinguish between requests that ‘appear[ ] reasonably calculated to lead to the discovery of admissible evidence’ … and demands that are ‘overly broad and unduly burdensome.’”

Documents Requested in Connection with the Claim Handler’s Deposition

The insured did not object to the claim handler’s deposition, but did make multiple objections to the document requests accompanying the notice of deposition.

Manuals and Training Documents Subject to Limited Discovery

Plaintiff’s first request was for “[a]ny and all documents, policies, procedures, rules, regulations, manuals, training documents, or other documents or things relevant to the handling and/or evaluation of Underinsured Motorists claims during the period of 2015-2020.”

Plaintiff’s second request was for “[a] true and correct copy of the complete “Claims Manual/Claims Office Manual” or other such similar document(s) by whatever name or title used by Defendants for the handling of Underinsured Motorists benefits for the years 2015 through and including 2020.”

Plaintiff’s third request was for “[a] true and correct copy of the complete “Training Manual” or other such similar document(s) by whatever name or title used by Defendant for the purpose of training its employees in the handling of Underinsured Motorists benefits claims for the years 2015 through and including 2020.”

Plaintiff’s fourth request was for “[t]rue and correct copies of any and all claims bulletins, internal memoranda, letters, notices, or similar documents sent by management to the claims staff relating to the handling of Underinsured Motorists benefits claims for the years 2015 through and including 2020.”

The court found the first request relevant to both the breach of contract and bad faith claims, specifically ruling that manuals and other training materials are relevant to bad faith claims “where they contain instructions concerning procedures used by employees in processing claims.” Magistrate Judge Perkin added that “[t]raining materials ‘relevant to processing the claim in question’ are discoverable, as they may show, inter alia, ‘that agents of an insurance company recklessly disregarded standard interpretations of a particular contractual provision in denying coverage or deliberatively omitted certain investigatory steps.’”

However, Magistrate Judge Perkin agreed with the insurer that plaintiff’s requests were “overly broad in time, and should be limited to the period from when Defendant was first on notice of a UIM claim through the present.” First notice was when the insurer received correspondence from Plaintiff’s counsel informing Defendant of an anticipated underinsured motorist claim.

Magistrate Judge Perkin limited the geographic scope as well, “to those documents and materials governing underinsured motorist claims in Pennsylvania,” where the underlying accident occurred, where plaintiff resided, and the policy provided for UIM benefits under Pennsylvania law.

Magistrate Judge Perkin rejected the argument that the materials were trade secrets or proprietary in nature, pointing out there was no showing made to this effect but only “bare allegations that the information requested falls under this definition” which were insufficient “to protect such information from discovery.”

The court used the same analysis to address document requests 2-4.

Court Permits Discovery, with Limitations, of Claim Handling and Investigation Files

Plaintiff requested “[t]rue and correct copies of any and all letters, correspondence, documents, reports, or other records which relate to review, evaluation, and/or assessment of the causation or lack thereof of Plaintiff’s injuries following the underlying motor vehicle accident which was relied upon in the handling, assessment, investigation, and/or evaluation of Plaintiff’s UIM claim.”

Plaintiff also requested “[a]ny and all claims, notes, correspondence, records, recordings, documents, letters, phone logs, emails, or other communication writings or things pertaining to [the claim] from October 12, 2016 through present.”

Magistrate Judge Perkin observed that “an insurer, is not permitted to shield the discovery of its entire claims handling and investigation under the attorney-client privilege and work-product doctrine by hiring an attorney to perform its services. As Plaintiff noted in her brief, a bad faith claim may include “evidence of the insurer’s bad faith that occurred after the filing of the complaint.” The court reviewed the insurer’s privilege log and redacted documents, but could not determine whether the attorney-client privilege or work product doctrine actually applied. Thus, Magistrate Judge Perkin ordered the insurer to make the full documents available for in camera review, including “internal file notes regarding communications with legal counsel … ; UIM strategy and evaluation; claim handling[;] Amount of reserves and legal expenses on the UIM and Medical Payment claims[;] … Evaluation Report for Plaintiff’s UIM claim [;] … internal emails regarding receipt of this lawsuit, and assignment to legal counsel … [;] ISO Claim Search report[; and] Asset report regarding [the tortfeasor driver], for consent to settle/waiver of UIM subrogation purposes[.]”

The second request quoted above was also subject to in camera review for the same reasons. The court added that “[t]o the extent that Defendant maintains any of the requested material outside of the web-based system, it shall produce such information immediately to Plaintiff unless it is appropriately protected by a privilege.”

These were limited to the time period from the date the insurer first had notice, as described above.

The insurer also requested “[a]ny and all claim files concerning Plaintiff’s claim for underinsured motorist benefits, in paper, electronic, and/or other available format.” Magistrate Judge Perkin ruled that “[a]s with the previous two requests, this Court will conduct an in camera review to determine if Defendant properly withheld documents related to this request. Defendant is not required to perform forensic investigation into its computing devices or systems to locate information existing prior to when Defendant’s duty to preserve evidence arose which is no longer accessible. Similarly, Defendant does not need to produce the same ESI in more than one form. Fed. R. Civ. P. 34(b)(2)(E)(iii). If Defendant maintains any information responsive to the above request in non-electronic forms, it shall produce such information immediately to Plaintiff unless it duplicative of what has already been produced or properly protected by a privilege.” [Emphasis in original]

Insurer not Compelled to Produce Personnel Files

The insured requested “[p]ersonnel file, including applications for employment, evaluations, awards, commendations, complaints, reprimands, resumes, attendance records for the period of 2016-2018, tests, performance appraisals, documents reflecting job performance and/or employee conduct, letters of commendation, reprimands, letters of termination, personnel action notices, investigative files and reports concerning or substantially concerning [the specific] Claims Specialist, only.”

Magistrate Judge Perkin ruled “[t]he request for personnel information implicates the strong public policy against disclosure of such materials.” Thus, “[w]hile information relating to [the claim handler’s] employment and job performance may be relevant to Plaintiff’s bad faith claim, Plaintiff may learn this information through less invasive means, such as by deposition or interrogatory. … Accordingly, while Plaintiff may obtain the employment information it seeks by deposing [the claim handler], or through interrogatories, Defendant is not compelled to produce the materials relating to the above request.”

Deposition of Corporate Designee Permitted

The court observed that corporate designees are called to testify about their personal knowledge only, but also to speak for the corporation “about matters to which the corporation has reasonable access.” In this case, the insured’s bad faith claim included allegations beyond valuation, “but also claims that defendant mishandled, failed to properly investigate and evaluate the claim and otherwise acted in bad faith.” Plaintiff wanted the 30(b)(6) designee “to represent the collective knowledge of the corporation and to present its positions on certain topics [,] including … “the manner and method of how Defendant instructs, advises, directs, and incentivizes its employees to handle claims is directly related to what, if anything, the adjuster(s) did in handling this claim and why.”

Magistrate Judge Perkin refused to quash the corporate designee’s deposition, finding the insured was “entitled to depose the corporate representative and obtain an official explanation of the claims-handling policies used by” the insurer.

He did not, however, stop there.  Rather, Magistrate Judge Perkin addressed objections to individual matters designated for examination and individual document requests accompanying the subpoena.

  1. “1st Matter for Examination: The thoughts, analysis, evaluation(s), rationale(s), investigation, actions, research, review, and reasoning of the handling adjuster’s supervisor at Defendant insurance company who personally participated in the decision to offer $6,000 on or about October 25, 2019, to resolve Plaintiff’s claim. (The term “participated” as used in this paragraph includes, without limitation, reviewed any documents, analyzed and/or discussed the matter with anyone, approved the offer of compromise or provided any information or input whatsoever into the decision).”

Magistrate Judge Perkin reserved ruling on this area of examination until after he had conducted the in camera review described above.

  1. “2nd Matter for Examination: The existence and content of any writings, files, procedures, claims-handling procedures, guidelines, claims manuals, or documents of any kind including any material contained in any computer which existed at any time from 2015 to the present, applicable to the handling and adjustment of Plaintiff’s claim.”

Magistrate Judge Pekin permitted this area of examination, to allow for questioning on “[t]he existence and content of any writings, files, procedures, claims-handling procedures, guidelines, claims manuals, or documents of any kind which existed from March 16, 2017 through 2020, applicable to the handling and adjustment of Plaintiff’s claim.”

  1. “3rd Matter for Examination: Defendant’s claims handling manuals, guidelines, or any other documents used to instruct personnel on the claims handling and/or adjustment practice used by State Farm to instruct/train/educate/direct or otherwise teach its claims adjusters to adjust first-party Underinsured Motorists (“UIM”) claims as of October 1, 2015.”

The court found this area of questioning relevant, within time and geographic limits, stating “[d]efendant’s claims handling manuals, guidelines, or any other documents used to instruct personnel on the claims handling and/or adjustment practice used by [the insurer] to instruct/train/educate/direct or otherwise teach its claims adjusters to adjust first-party Underinsured Motorists (“UIM”) claims in Pennsylvania from March 16, 2017 through 2020.”

  1. “4th Matter for Examination: State Farm’s policy, practice and procedure for promotion of claims representatives and/or adjusters within State Farm as of October 1, 2015 through the present.”

The court found the insurer’s “policies, practices, and procedures for promotions of claims representatives and adjusters is relevant to its claim of bad faith. To the extent that there are employee incentives to close out insureds’ claims, or handle claims in a particular manner, such information could reveal facts relevant to the motivations of the employees who handled Plaintiff’s claim.” Discovery was thus allowed, within a limited time frame.

  1. “5th Matter for Examination: Defendant’s training materials, practices, and procedures for claims adjusters handling UIM claims as of October 1, 2015 through the present.”

The court permitted discovery within time and geographic limits, “Defendant’s training materials, practices, and procedures for claims adjusters handling UIM claims in Pennsylvania as of March 16, 2017 through 2020.”

  1. “6th Matter for Examination: Defendant’s methods, policies, procedures, and practices used to calculate the value of damages in a UIM claim as of October 1, 2015 through the present.”

Again, the court permitted discovery within time and geographic limits, “Defendant’s methods, policies, procedures, and practices used to calculate the value of damages in a UIM claim in Pennsylvania as of March 16, 2017 through 2020.”

  1. “7th Matter for Examination: Any and all materials provided to claims adjusters handling UIM claims for the purpose of training claims adjusters and/or representatives as to calculating, evaluation, assessing, and determining value of damages as of October 1, 2015 through the present.”

Again, the court permitted discovery within time and geographic limits, “Any and all materials provided to claims adjusters handling UIM claims in Pennsylvania for the purpose of training claims adjusters and/or representatives as to calculating, evaluation, assessing, and determining value of damages as of March 16, 2017 through 2020.”

  1. “8th Matter for Examination: The policies and procedures for evaluating, assessing, and investigating personal injuries to an insured in a UIM claim as of October 1, 2015 through the present.”

Again, the court permitted discovery within time and geographic limits, “The policies and procedures for evaluating, assessing, and investigating personal injuries to an insured in a UIM claim in Pennsylvania as of March 16, 2017 through 2020.”

The court next addressed the document requests accompanying the corporate designee’s notice of deposition.

  1. “Request 1: Any and all claims manuals, reference materials, training manuals, and/or guidelines for interpretation of the relevant insurance policy.”

Following his analysis in addressing the document requests accompanying the claim handler’s notice of deposition, Magistrate Judge Perkin found the request relevant to the bad faith claim, within the limited time period.  To the extent the response would be identical to the other request, however, he would not require a separate production; rather, the defendant could cross reference that earlier production to bates numbers.

  1. “Request 2: Any and all documents, materials, manuals, guides, claims manuals, handbooks, training materials or other items relating to the topics set forth above.”

Again following the same request to the claim handler, the documents were relevant to the bad faith claim within a limited time period, and the same process of cross-referencing to bates numbers could be followed.

  1. “Request 3: The personnel files of all company employees who worked on Plaintiff’s UIM claim.”

Again following the earlier analysis, the insurer was not required to produce written materials, leaving the insured to pursue that employment information through the deposition or interrogatories.

Date of Decision:  January 22, 2021

SOLANO-SANCHEZ v. STATE FARM MUTUAL AUTO INSURANCE COMPANY, U.S. District Court Eastern District of Pennsylvania No. CV 19-4016, 2021 WL 229400 (E.D. Pa. Jan. 22, 2021) (Perkin, M.J.)

NO BAD FAITH BASED ON: (1) COMPARISON OF OFFER AND RESERVES; (2) UIPA VIOLATIONS; (3) LOWER SETTLEMENT OFFER THAN INSURED DEMANDED; (4) FAILURE TO RAISE SETTLEMENT OFFER; (5) INSURED’S FAILURE TO NEGOTIATE; (6) TIMING OF PARTIAL PAYMENT; OR (7) CLAIM MANUAL (Western District)

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In Western District Magistrate Judge Dodge’s May 2020 opinion in this case, the court allowed this UIM bad faith claim to survive a motion to dismiss. That decision is summarized here.  Her present opinion addresses the insurer’s summary judgment motion on bad faith.

The stipulated facts show, among other things, the insured’s injuries, that the tortfeasor’s carrier paid $50,000, that the insured demanded full UIM policy limits of $500,000, that the insurer set a $25,000 reserve and offered $10,000 to settle the claim fully, and that there was a dispute among medical experts about the scope of future treatment.  The record showed that the insurer’s claim adjustor reviewed new information from the insured on a number of occasions and found no basis to revise his damage analysis behind the $25,000 reserve figure.

After a considerable time period, the insured’s counsel did demand partial payment of the $10,000, saying this was undisputed, but never provided a full counter demand to the $10,000 offer because the course of medical treatment remained open.  The insurer eventually agreed to pay the $10,000, but the record appears ambiguous as to how each side interpreted the conditions of that payment.

Although the earlier motion to dismiss resulted in dismissal of claims asserting a private right of action under the Unfair Insurance Practices Act (UIPA), the insured asserted there were technical violations of the UIPA that could be considered in ruling on a statutory bad faith claim.

The court identified the following bad faith claims:

  1. The insurer allegedly “failed to re-evaluate the UIM claim when presented with new information and then make a higher offer despite raising the amount of its reserves.”

  2. The insurer “failed to make a timely partial payment of $10,000 even though that amount was undisputed.

  3. The insurer “violated the UIPA and its own claims-handling policies in at least two respects—by failing to notify [the insured] of its position that his alleged contributory negligence reduced the value of his claim, and failing to respond to an offer within ten days.”

Poor Judgment is Not Bad Faith

Magistrate Judge Dodge stated that “neither an insured’s disagreement with the amount offered on a UIM claim nor a citation to negligent mistakes made by the insurer in handling the claim is sufficient to demonstrate bad faith.”

She looked to Judge Hornak’s recent Stewart decision, summarized here, granting the insurer summary judgment “where plaintiff pedestrian suffered injuries that he valued at $2 million but the insurer investigated, set the value of the claim at $125,000, set reserves at $55,000 and offered $25,000” and Judge McVerry’s 2013 Schifino decision, summarized here, where a “$10,000 initial offer on UIM claim valued at $60,000 did not constitute bad faith and although [the insurer’s] conduct was ‘not free from criticism in its initial handling of the claim … this conduct is more indicative of poor judgment than bad faith.’”

Setting Aside Reserves Cannot be used as a Cudgel

Magistrate Judge Dodge also addressed the law concerning reserves, stating that “setting aside reserves does not amount to an admission of liability.” “Reserves are merely amounts set aside by insurers to cover potential future liabilities,” and “the setting of reserves is an estimate of an insurer’s exposure under a claim …[but] the court is reluctant to fashion a rule requiring an insurer to make an offer reflecting the reserve as soon as it is set.” Thus, “bad faith does not hinge on whether an offer is less than the reserves….”

The Alleged Failure to Increase an Offer is Not Bad Faith

The court rejected the claim that the insurer had raised reserves while failing to reevaluate the claim. In fact, the claim handler had not raised reserves even after receiving new information from the insured, but kept the reserves at the same figure after evaluating that new information.

The adjustor’s claims notes omitted $45,000 in medical expenses at two different dates, which were in his original evaluation. The insured claimed this demonstrated bad faith in evaluating the claims. The adjustor testified “that this was simply a mistake ‘because if you look at the doctor’s notes there’s no difference in what I already knew.’ Thus, this evidence suggests that [the] adjustor made an error when he recorded or updated information in his notes. This would amount to negligence, not bad faith. Importantly, it is undisputed that [the adjustor] concluded in each evaluation that a reserve setting of $25,000 was appropriate and his assessment of the potential value of the UIM claim did not change.”

Further, simply because the $10,000 offer was lower than the reserves did not prove bad faith, nor was it even “evidence of bad faith.” There also was no evidence the adjustor concluded the UIM claim’s value “was far in excess of the amount he set as a reserve or that his offer was unreasonable.”

The court distinguished the well-known Boneberger case on grounds that case was about intentionally devious claim handling practices used to create artificially low values. It was not about simply making offers that were much lower than the claimed value.

Magistrate Judge Dodge then discussed case law recognizing the principle that low but reasonable estimates cannot support bad faith claims. She looked to the Third Circuit’s 2019 Rau decision, summarized here. In addition, she looked to Judge Conti’s Katta opinion, summarized here, in observing factors weighing against bad faith, such as: the uncertainty of the claim’s value; “the offer was not unreasonably low because an initial offer below the alleged amount of loss does not constitute evidence of bad faith”; the insurer’s willingness to increase its offer and the insured’s refusal to negotiate down from a policy limit demand; and the insured’s failure to provide additional information to the insurer as to why its offer should be increased.

The court quoted Judge Conti at length: “It is troubling that plaintiff seeks to proceed with his bad faith claim despite having made no effort to engage in negotiations with defendant. Plaintiff was under no duty to negotiate, but courts have recognized that stonewalling negotiations is a relevant consideration in determining whether an insurer acted in bad faith. …. If plaintiff’s bad faith claim were to proceed, future plaintiffs could survive summary judgment on bad faith claims by simply filing suit after receiving an offer that the plaintiff believes is too low. The mere fact that defendant’s initial offer was lower than plaintiff’s unsubstantiated claim of lost wages, in absence of any other substantive evidence of bad faith, including unreasonable delay, intentional deception, or the like, is not sufficient to constitute clear and convincing evidence.”

In the present case, the insured never made a counter demand or attempted to negotiate after the $10,000 initial offer, and never came off of a policy limit demand.  Moreover, as set out above, the adjustor’s claim handling and claim evaluation were not unreasonable.

Partial Payment Issue not a Basis for Bad Faith

Magistrate Judge Dodge cited Third Circuit precedent that a failure to make partial payment could only reach the level of bad faith “where the evidence demonstrated that two conditions had been met. The first is that the insurance company conducted, or the insured requested but was denied, a separate assessment of some part of her claim (i.e., that there was an undisputed amount). The second is, at least until such a duty is clearly established in law (so that the duty is a known duty), that the insured made a request for partial payment.” She observed Pennsylvania’s Superior Court has followed this standard.

In the present case, there was no separate assessment of a partial claim, or any partial valuation carried out, resulting in an agreed upon undisputed partial sum due.  There was only an offer that the insured originally declined, but later demanded be paid without the insured admitting he either accepted or rejected that offer. Rather, the insured’s counsel asked the carrier to “issue a draft in the amount of the $10,000 as a partial payment of the UIM benefits until a counter can be made and the matter can be resolved in full.” Further, even when the $10,000 was paid, the parties disagreed over the meaning of the payment.

Magistrate Judge Dodge concluded the “agreement to pay to Plaintiffs the amount of its previous offer to settle the UIM claim does not represent evidence of bad faith.” While it might be generally correct to characterized the $10,000 as undisputed “there were no communications about this amount representing a separate assessment of some component of [the] claim.” Moreover, any delay in paying the $10,000 fell on the insured.

“Thus, to the extent that Plaintiffs continue to assert that the failure [] to make a more timely partial payment represents bad faith, any such claim fails as a matter of law. Plaintiffs cannot assert that [the insurer] acted in bad faith by offering to make a partial payment—which it was not required to do—and not offering it again sooner after Plaintiffs rejected it.”

UIPA Violations Cannot Form the Basis of a Bad Faith Claim

The parties agreed there is no private right of action under the UIPA. The insured, however, wanted to use UIPA violations as evidence of statutory bad faith. The court rejected that effort.

Magistrate Judge Dodge stated that since the seminal Terletsky opinion in 1994, “federal courts have uniformly rejected plaintiffs’ attempt to rely on UIPA violations to support bad faith claims.” Contrary to the insured’s arguments that some federal cases hold otherwise, she states that “for the past 26 years, case law in federal courts on this issue has been consistent.”  Magistrate Judge Dodge cites, among other cases, the Third Circuit’s opinion in Leach, Judge Gibson’s 2019 Horvath opinion, Judge Fisher’s 2014 Kelman decision (while sitting by designation in the Western District), Judge Kosik’s 2007 Oehlmann decision, and Judge Conti’s 2007 Loos opinion.

[Our May 2, 2019 post summarizes different approaches courts take in considering UIPA and Unfair Claim Settlement Practices regulations.]

No Bad Faith Based on Insurer’s Own Manuals

Magistrate Judge Dodge found this was not a case where the insurer’s manuals and guidelines recommended aggressive claims handling and litigation tactics to discourage an insured’s legitimate claims.  “In this case, there is no evidence in the record that [the insurer’s] manual promotes improper tactics or conduct; quite the contrary.”

The court also rejected the argument that the insurer acted in bad faith by violating its own claim handling policies. “The issue here is not whether [the insurer’s] claims handling policy is admissible, but whether it provides any support for Plaintiffs’ bad faith claim. It does not.”

In sum, partial summary judgment was granted on the bad faith claim.

Date of Decision:  December 10, 2020

Kleinz v. Unitrin Auto and Home Insurance Company, U.S. District Court Western District of Pennsylvania No. 2:19-CV-01426, 2020 WL 7263548 (W.D. Pa. Dec. 10, 2020) (Dodge, M.J.)

NO BAD FAITH: (1) LOW BUT REASONABLE SETTLEMENT OFFER; (2) FAILURE TO PAY FULL RESERVES NOT BAD FAITH; (3) ADDITIONAL INVESTIGATION WOULD NOT HAVE CHANGED RESULT; (4) INSURED DELAYED CLAIMS HANDLING (Western District)

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In this UIM bad faith case, the court set out a detailed claims handling history. It shows an active claims handler, conflicting expert reports, and what appears to be a genuine dispute over the scope of the insured’s injury. The central discrepancy is between permanent disability vs. no medical record of serious injury.

The court granted summary judgment on bad faith, finding the insured could not meet the clear and convincing evidence standard. It specifically addressed four issues in reaching this conclusion.

  1. Was the Settlement Offer Unreasonably Low?

The insured claimed losses in excess of $2,000,000. The UIM insurer offered $25,000. As the tortfeasor’s carrier paid $100,000, this meant the UIM carrier valued the claim at $125,000.

The court set out the relevant law. Low but reasonable offers are not bad faith, but “low-ball offers which bear no reasonable relationship to an insured’s actual losses can constitute bad faith….” A carrier can reasonably rely on expert opinion when investigating claims. In this context, insurers “can rely on IMEs of qualified health professionals who examine claimants in a usual and customary manner.”

First, the court found the claims handler’s well documented file showed an IME was warranted. Next, the court examined the claims handler’s review of the insured’s economic expert’s report of over a $2,000,000. The court found that multiple medical reports provided the claims handler with a reasonable basis to question the economic expert’s critical assumption of permanent disabled. “Thus, with no other evidence to establish [the insured’s] economic losses other than [the economic expert’s] report that assumes total disability, no reasonable juror could find bad faith by clear and convincing evidence from [the] $25,000 settlement offer to [the insured].”

  1. Reserves

Reserves were set at $55,000. The insured asserted the insurer should have offered the $55,000, rather than $25,000. The court stated that an insurance company must set reserves aside when placed on notice of a possible loss arising under its policy. “However, the failure of a carrier to offer its full settlement authority does not constitute bad faith.” In the present case, “because the Court finds no sufficient evidence of bad faith as to the $25,000 settlement offer, there is likewise no bad faith in [the insurer’s] reserve for this UIM claim.”

  1. Adequacy of Investigation

To prove bad faith investigation, the insured “must show that the outcome of the case would have been different if the insurer had done what the insured wanted done.” The putative investigative failures here would not have changed the result.

Thus, even if the claims handler had reviewed the economic loss reports with her own economic experts, sought medical authorizations, or spoken to treating physicians or the tortfeasor’s lawyer, this additional investigation would not have altered the IME opinions that there was no permanent injury, and that any injuries had resolved. These IMEs provided a reasonable basis to contest value. “Therefore, [the insured] cannot meet his burden to show that a reasonable juror could find by clear and convincing evidence that [the insurer] would have evaluated [the] claim differently had it conducted an earlier or different investigation as argued by plaintiff’s counsel.”

  1. Unnecessary Delay in Investigation

“In order for an insured to recover for bad faith from delay, an insured must demonstrate that ‘the delay is attributable to the defendant, that the defendant had no reasonable basis for the actions it undertook which resulted in the delay, and that the defendant knew or recklessly disregarded the fact that it had no reasonable basis to deny payment.’”

The court first observed that much of the delay in this matter was caused by the insured. There were delays in providing information and producing documents to the insurer. The insured also changed his damage theory during the claims handling process, which led to insurer to require additional evaluations. Thus, “no reasonable juror could conclude by clear and convincing evidence that [the insurer] acted in bad faith in the timeline of its investigation….”

Date of Decision: February 19, 2020

Stewart v. GEICO Insurance, U.S. District Court Western District of Pennsylvania 2:18-CV-00791-MJH, 2020 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 28459 (W.D. Pa. Feb. 19, 2020) (Horan, J.)

Our thanks to Attorney Dan Cummins of the excellent Tort Talk Blog for bringing this case to our attention.

 

DISCOVERY IN BAD FAITH CASE: (1) RESERVES DISCOVERABLE; (2) MENTAL IMPRESSIONS NOT DISCOVERABLE; (3) TRADE SECRET OBJECTIONS CANNOT STAND ABSENT APPROPRIATE MOTION FOR PROTECTIVE ORDER (Philadelphia Federal)

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In this bad faith action, Eastern District Judge Slomsky addressed three disputed discovery issues: (1) reserves; (2) claim adjuster work product; and (3) trade secrets.

Reserves are Discoverable

District courts within the Third Circuit are split on whether reserves are discoverable in bad faith cases. In this action, Judge Slomsky stood with those judges who find reserves relevant and discoverable.

Work Product Privilege not Eviscerated Simply by Bringing a Bad Faith Action

On the other hand, he refused to require production of a claim adjuster’s mental impressions simply because it was a bad faith case. As the court states: “In essence, Plaintiff’s sole argument to compel production of [the adjuster’s] mental impressions is that [the mental impressions] are relevant merely because this case contains a bad faith claim. It is well-settled that this argument is insufficient to disregard the work-product privilege set forth in Rule 26.”

Trade Secret Objections Fail When (1) Insurer Does not Move for Protective Order, and (2) Does not Lay Out Nature of Trade Secrets in Opposing Motion to Compel

The insurer made redactions to document production based on trade secret objections. The court first observed that Pennsylvania Civil Rule 4012 governed this trade secrets issue, rather than the Federal Rules. The interpreted Pa.R.C.P. 4012 to require a party objecting on this basis to bring a motion for a protective order in the first instance, which the insurer did not do in this case. The court then observed that the insurer failed to address the insured’s arguments against the presence of trade secret protections, which could have been done without revealing any trade secrets. Still, after granting the motion to compel on this issue, the court gave leave for the insurer to file an “appropriate” motion for a protective order.

Date of Decision: July 16, 2019

Penn-Dion Corp. v. Great American Insurance Co. of N.Y., U. S. District Court Eastern District of Pennsylvania CIVIL ACTION NO. 17-4634, 2019 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 117635, 2019 WL 3202503 (E.D. Pa. July 16, 2019) (Slomsky, J.)

COURT ADDRESSES DISCOVERY RE: (1) RESERVES (2) OTHER CLAIMS/DISPUTES; (3) CLAIM LOGS; (4) CLAIM STATUS REPORTS; (5) POLICY AND PROCEDURE MANUALS; (6) EMPLOYEE INCENTIVES; (7) ANTICIPATION OF LITIGATION/WORK PRODUCT; AND (8) OVERBROAD DISCOVERY LANGUAGE (Middle District)

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This case addresses a number of discovery issues in this first party benefit denial breach of contract and bad faith case.

RESERVES (BAD FAITH ON COVERAGE VS. REFUSAL TO SETTLE/VALUE DISPUTES)

Magistrate Judge Carlson observed courts in the Third Circuit are split on whether reserves are discoverable in bad faith cases. He first states that when the bad faith case is about a failure to settle or dispute over a claim’s value, the prevailing view is that reserves are discoverable. “However, when the bad faith claim is based on a denial of coverage and ‘does not involve the value of the claim or [the plaintiff’s] estimation of liability… the reserve information requested is neither relevant nor reasonably calculated to lead to the discovery of admissible evidence.”

The alleged bad faith in this case is based on denying coverage through a biased and unfair review process, and not a dispute over value. Thus, reserves are irrelevant to the bad faith claim, and production is not required.

OTHER MATTERS NOT RELEVANT OR DISCOVERABLE

The alleged basis of the bad faith claim was that the insurer intentionally used a biased peer review organization and doctor to terminate plaintiff’s medical benefits unfairly. Plaintiff served interrogatories concerning virtually all matters in which the same PRO and doctor were selected by the insurer. Magistrate Judge Carlson did not permit this discovery.

The court first looked at prior case law denying discovery on the issue of the size of an adjuster’s case load, finding it both irrelevant and of marginal utility compared to the burden imposed on the insurer to make production. In the present case, Magistrate Judge Carlson found that “the number of times that this PRO and/or doctor decided in favor of the insurer, whether on initial review or on reconsideration, will not necessarily speak to any such bias.” If, e.g., a PRO found for the insurer 98 out of a 100 times, “those 98 claims may very well have been legitimately decided on their merits, which could not be known without an extensive post hoc evaluation of the merits of each claim.”

The court was not going to carry out that kind of evaluation, and observed that “courts in this circuit have held that ‘discovery of other insureds’ claims in bad faith cases is generally improper, as such information is irrelevant.”

ADDITIONAL RULINGS ON CLAIMS LOGS, CLAIMS STATUS REPORTS, ANTICIPATION OF LITIGATION, OVERBROAD DISCOVERY LANGUAGE, EMPLOYEE INCENTIVES, AND POLICY/PROCEDURE MANUALS

Magistrate Judge Carlson made the following additional points and rulings:

  1. Magistrate Judges have broad discretion in resolving discovery disputes.

  2. Plaintiff alleged there was a biased peer review process used to deny medical benefits. The court found the portions of the insurer’s policy manuals on the peer review process, and employee procedures or policies for handling inquiries about insurance policies, must be produced.

  3. A request for “all communications of any nature whatsoever” concerning the complaint are vague and overbroad, as are requests for communications regarding “any matters raised by Plaintiff’s and Defendants’ initial disclosures”.

  4. The work product doctrine kicked in when plaintiff’s counsel wrote to the insurer expressing dissatisfaction with the outcome of the PRO process. Actual suit or even the threat of suit are not required to trigger the insurer’s anticipation of litigation. Thus, claim notes created after the date of that letter received work product protection, but claim notes before that date had to be produced.

  5. Claim log entries indicating an employee simply looked at the file or generically uploaded a document are not protected work product.

  6. The insurer was required to respond to an interrogatory asking for “the nature and amount of any employee incentive to close out insureds’ claims”.

Date of Decision: February 6, 2019

Barnard v. Liberty Mutual Insurance Corp., U. S. District Court Middle District of Pennsylvania Civil No. 3:18-CV-01218, 2019 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 18660 (M.D. Pa. Feb. 6, 2019) (Carlson, M.J.)

SEPTEMBER 2018 BAD FAITH CASES: RESERVES DISCOVERABLE IN BAD FAITH ACTION; WORK PRODUCT PROTECTION DOES NOT ARISE WITH MERE SUGGESTION OF LITIGATION (Philadelphia Federal)

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This discovery dispute arose in a UIM bad faith case over the insurer’s seeking to reduce benefits after taking the position it had overpaid for lost income.

The insurer refused to produce claims file materials based on the work product doctrine. These included (1) employee mental impressions and opinions about the claim and (2) reserve information. The court ordered the parties to meet and to try and reach agreement on the date the insurer reasonably anticipated litigation. If any document remained in dispute, these would be considered for in camera review. The insurer ultimately submitted redacted and unredacted claim filed documents to the court, and an annotated privilege log identifying the disputed documents.

Among other things, the court observed that “discovery disputes involving an insurance company’s claims file often present problems for the parties because the ordinary course of an insurer’s business involves evaluating its policyholder’s claims.” It stated that “The temporal trigger for work product protection in this context is the point in its investigation an insurance company’s activity shifts from mere claims evaluation to an anticipation of litigation.” The burden is on the insurer to “demonstrate that it subjectively anticipated litigation, and that the anticipation was objectively reasonable.”

The court rejected the notion that protected was triggered when the insured’s lawyer told the carrier he wanted to discuss the case to avoid litigation. “[A] lawyer’s mere suggestion of a lawsuit is not enough to make an insurer reasonably anticipate litigation when the insurer’s evaluation of the claim is ongoing.” In this case, the ongoing claim payments indicated the evaluation process was continuing even after this statement.

The court next found there was no per se standard under the controlling federal rules barring discovery of reserves under the work product doctrine. It further noted that prior Pennsylvania state law, relied on by the carrier, left open the issue of whether reserves were discoverable in bad faith cases. The court added that the insurer did not provide factual support that the reserves were prepared in anticipation of litigation.

[See this blog post discussing discovery and reserves.]

Date of Decision: August 22, 2018

Neidich v. Progressive Advanced Insurance Co., U. S. District Court Eastern District of Pennsylvania CIVIL ACTION NO. 17-5375, 2018 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 142445 (E.D. Pa. Aug. 22, 2018) (Padova, J.)

 

 

DECEMBER 2017 BAD FAITH CASES: MEDIATION PRIVILEGE INAPPLICABLE TO MOST COMMUNICATIONS; REINSURANCE INFORMATION DISCOVERABLE EVEN IF NOT ULTIMATELY ADMISSIBLE (Western District)

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The insured was involved in a deadly motor vehicle accident. The insurer could have settled the case within the $11,000,000 policy limit, but declined to do so. The case was mediated before two different mediators and the judge held a settlement conference. The case went to trial and the jury awarded $32,000,000. The insured sued for breach of contract and bad faith.

During the bad faith litigation, the insured sought discovery concerning the mediations and reinsurance. The insurer asserted the mediation privilege and that the reinsurance documents were not relevant.

The insured argued that the purpose of Pennsylvania’s mediation privilege is to enable the parties to be frank and honest with the mediator and/or opposing parties without fear of reprisal in a subsequent bad faith lawsuit for doing so.” The insurer had the burden in asserting this privilege.

MEDIATION PRIVILEGE

As a practice point, the court observed the insurer “did not specify on its privilege log whether its decision to redact or withhold a document was because a portion of a document was ‘a mediation communication’ or a ‘mediation document’ as those terms are defined. Instead, [the insurer] merely opted to cite the statute and then let this Court attempt to discern what [it] meant by the following entry on its privilege log: ‘Mediation and/or settlement conference privilege pursuant to 42 Pa.C.S. §5949, F.R.E. 408, and/or applicable law.’”

The court then stated that the insurer had reciting the statutory definitions of mediation communication and mediation document and then argued that “‘[a]ll of the documents withheld and/or redacted … and submitted to the Court in camera qualify as mediation documents or mediation communications.’” The court went on to describe this as a lack of pointed argument.

Pertaining to documents redacted or withheld, the court found that “none of the redacted or withheld documents qualify as ‘a mediation document’ under the plain meaning of Pennsylvania’s mediation privilege statute except for” a single document. As to that document, it should only have been “redacted where the mediator … wrote an email ….”

Under 42 Pa.C.S. 5949, “mediation document” is defined as: “Written material, including copies, prepared for the purpose of, in the course of or pursuant to mediation. The term includes, but is not limited to, memoranda, notes, files, records and work product of a mediator, mediation program or party.”

The court then went on to address mediation communications within the documents, which the statute defines as: “A communication, verbal or nonverbal, oral or written, made by, between or among a party, mediator, mediation program or any other person present to further the mediation process when the communication occurs during a mediation session or outside a session when made to or by the mediator or mediation program.”

The court refused to apply the mediation privilege to statements made outside the mediation that did not in some way include the mediator.

The court did protect communication from the insured’s expert consultant relaying something the mediator said. However, it did not protect “redacted statements a mediator or a party may have said during the course of a mediation” in other circumstances.

Specifically, it did not protect these communications where the documents including those statements “are nothing more than reports and/or claims notes. These redacted documents contain statements which were made by a person who may have been present at the mediation session to someone (not the mediator) outside the mediation session.

Thus, they do not meet the plain meaning of the definition of ‘mediation communication’ and therefore, are not protected by Pennsylvania’s mediation privilege.” (Emphasis in original)

REINSURANCE DISCOVERY

On the reinsurance documents, the court observed that there “is no absolute exclusion of reinsurance information, as discovery of such information has been readily permitted,” citing at least one case on the issue of reserves being discoverable in bad faith litigation to support this position.

The court also quoted case law that “the purpose of permitting discovery of the existence of and content of any insurance agreement is to equalize the knowledge of both parties and give the plaintiff ‘assurance that there can be recovery in the event of a favorable verdict to justify the time, effort and expense of preparing for trial.’ … Although the discovered information may not be admissible at trial, it would allow parties to fairly evaluate settlement offers and foster a just, speedy and inexpensive determination.”

Relying on these cases, the court concluded that: “Given the nature of this case, and the allegations brought by Golon, this Court finds that all of [insurer’s] documents which were either withheld or redacted because the document either referenced or discussed reinsurance should be produced in their entirety.

However, this does not guarantee that these documents will be admissible at the time of trial. The Court is ordering them produced so that [the insured] can evaluate what [the insurer] did or did not do, and when [the insurer] took action with its own reinsurer, in relation to the underlying claim.”

The Court subsequently denied two emergency motions for reconsideration.

Date of Decision: December 7, 2017/December 14, 2017

Golon, Inc. v. Selective Ins. Co., No. 17cv0819, 2017 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 201792 (W.D. Pa. Dec. 7, 2017) (Schwab, J.)

Golon v. Selective Ins. Co., No. 17cv0819, 2017 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 213966 (W.D. Pa. Dec. 14, 2017) (Schwab, J.)

 

OCTOBER 2017 BAD FAITH CASES: COURT ADDRESSES A WIDE RANGE OF BAD FAITH DISCOVERY ISSUES AS TO PRIVILEGE, WORK PRODUCT, AND RESERVES (Western District)

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This is a discovery opinion addressing a wide range of issues including the attorney client privilege, work product doctrine and discovery of reserves. A number of rulings were held in abeyance pending in camera review, which are not addressed below

1.        The attorney client privilege is not limited to claims handler communications with outside counsel.

“This Court is not aware of any authority that limits the attorney-client privilege to communications with outside counsel, as opposed to in-house counsel, and Plaintiff has cited none. Therefore, this Court rejects Plaintiffs’ claim that the attorney-client privilege could not have attached before Attorney McDonnell was retained as outside counsel to handle Plaintiffs’ claim.”

2.         The privilege is not abrogated simply because a document is relevant to a bad faith claim.

“Plaintiffs next assert that the documents listed in the privilege log titled ‘Communications with counsel regarding the value and merits of claim’ are not privileged because they “go to the heart of this bad faith action[.]” (ECF No. 20 at 8.) However, as Defendant notes, the Third Circuit has unequivocally held that ‘[r]elevance is not the standard for determining whether or not evidence should be protected from disclosure as privileged, and that remains the case even if one might conclude the facts to be disclosed are vital, highly probative, directly relevant or even go to the heart of an issue.’ Rhone-Poulenc Rorer Inc. v. Home Indem. Co., 32 F.3d 851, 864 (3d Cir. 1994). Moreover, ‘[a] party does not lose the privilege to protect attorney client communications from disclosure in discovery when his or her state of mind is put in issue in the action.’ Id. Thus, while Plaintiffs are correct that these communications ‘go to the heart’ of Plaintiffs’ bad faith claim, this fact does not change the analysis of whether these communications are protected by the attorney-client privilege.

3.     Documents prepared by claims adjusters and sent to attorneys are privileged.

“Plaintiffs also claim that ‘communications made by the claims representatives are not immune from discovery.’ This argument is easily dismissed. ‘[T]he attorney-client privilege operates in a two-way fashion to protect confidential client-to-attorney or attorney-to-client communications made for the purpose of obtaining or providing professional legal advice.’ The fact that the documents were prepared by the claims adjusters, rather than the attorney to whom the documents were sent, is immaterial to the analysis of whether those documents are protected under the attorney-client privilege.”

4.         Reserves discoverable in bad faith action.

The court found reserve information discoverable in bad faith cases. It wrote the following in explaining its position:

“There is competing treatment of whether reserve information is discoverable in a bad faith lawsuit.” Shaffer v. State Farm Mut. Auto. Ins. Co., No. 1:13-CV-01837, 2014 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 30436, 2014 WL 931101, at *2 (M.D. Pa. 2014). “Some courts have noted a ‘tenuous link between reserves and actual liability given that numerous considerations factor into complying with this statutory directive.'” Sharp, 2014 Pa. Dist. & Cnty. Dec. LEXIS 282, 2014 WL 8863084 at *8, quoting Fidelity & Deposit Co., 168 F.R.D. at 525 (citing Rhone-Poulenc Rorer, Inc. v. Home Indemnity Co., 139 F.R.D. 609, 613 (E.D. Pa. 1991)). However, as a court of common pleas recently stated:

Several trial courts, including this court, have reasoned that insurance reserves are discoverable in bad faith litigation against insurers, where liability for the underlying claim has already been established, since such information may be relevant to the issue of whether the insurer acted in bad faith in failing to settle or pay the original claim. See Consugar v. Nationwide Insurance Co. of America, 2011 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 61756, 2011 WL 2360208, at * 5 (M.D. Pa. 2011) (‘Since plaintiff here claims that defendant acted [*19]  in bad faith, a comparison between the reserve value of the claim and defendant’s actions in processing plaintiff’s claim could shed light on defendant’s potential liability.’); North River Ins. Co. [v. Greater New York Mut. Ins. Co.], 872 F. Supp. [1411] at 1412 [(E.D. Pa. 1995)] (finding reserve information “relevant to the question of whether or not [the insurer] acted in bad faith during the pre-trial settlement negotiations.”); McAndrew v. Donegal Mutual Ins. Co., 56 Pa. D. & C. 4th 1, 18 (Lacka. Co. 2002); Fretz v. Mutual Benefit Ins. Co., 37 Pa. D. & C. 4th 173, 180 (Alleg. Co. 1998). Sharp, 2014 Pa. Dist. & Cnty. Dec. LEXIS 282, 2014 WL 8863084 at *8.”

5.     Reserves concerning insured’s claim are discoverable, but reserves concerning other claims are not, and court will not indulge fishing expedition on setting reserves for other claims.

“Defendant’s boilerplate responses also contend that Plaintiffs’ requests are overly broad. … This Court disagrees with Defendant’s contention in regards to Interrogatory No. 5, in which Plaintiffs’ seek information regarding the reserve history for [the insured’s] own claim. Because the gist of Plaintiffs’ complaint is that Defendant acted in bad faith in handling [the insured’s] underinsured motorists claim, Plaintiffs’ request for the reserve history for [her] claim is not overly broad.”

“However, this Court agrees with Defendant that RPD No. 4 is overly broad. While Plaintiffs have demonstrated the relevancy of the reserve amounts for [the insured’s] own claim, Plaintiffs have not shown — nor even argued in their Motion to Compel — that reserve information for other insureds is relevant to Plaintiffs’ claim. Therefore, Defendant will only be required to produce any relevant documentation of the reserve history for [the insured’s] claim.”

“RPD No. 4 asks for “all documents relating to or involving the process used from 2011 to the present in setting or otherwise establishing or determining reserves for underinsured motorists claims.” (ECF No. 20-2 at 4.) However, neither Plaintiffs’ Motion to Compel nor Defendant’s Brief in Opposition contain any argument concerning whether or not discovery of Defendant’s reserve process for other insureds is appropriate. In other words, neither party addresses the issue of whether RPD No. 4 seeks documents that are outside of the context of Plaintiffs’ specific claim. To the extent that Plaintiffs’ ask for discovery of reserve information for other claims, this Court declines the invitation to allow Plaintiffs to embark on a fishing expedition.”

6.       Work product doctrine not applicable to reserve information in this case.

“The only other objection that Defendant has put forth is its boilerplate response that the information requested by RPD No. 4 and Interrogatory No. 5 ‘is protected from discovery by the work-product doctrine.’ … However, Defendant’s threadbare and conclusory invocations of the work product doctrine fail to establish that Defendant is entitled to the privilege it asserts. Moreover, Defendant does not even argue in its Brief in Opposition that this information is protected by the work-product doctrine. Further, according to the reserve history for [the insured’s] claim, the reserve values were set by non-attorneys. … In fact, Defendant has not asserted that the reserve amounts were set or altered at the direction of, or with the cooperation of, counsel. Therefore, Defendant has failed to establish that the information Plaintiffs seek is protected by the work-product doctrine.”

Date of Decision: October 2, 2017

Parisi v. State Farm Mut. Auto. Ins. Co., CIVIL ACTION NO. 3:16-179, 2017 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 162131 (W.D. Pa. Oct. 2, 2017) (Gibson, J.)